Is OSX Lion a valid choice yet? Any issues?

Hi,

My Snow Leopard just let me down and now it could be a "good" moment to
upgrade to Lion.

But I'm not sure is it an option yet.
I would be using Rails 3.0.9, Ruby 1.9.2 via RVM. Postgresql DB. And
probably some stuff via homebrew. Git, Versions and that type of stuff.

Are the lights red for Lion since it is so fresh?

Any experiences?

Thanks.

Works very well. Only thing to watch out for is that you compile rmagick correctly so that you don’t run in the threading issue.

That should read imagemagick when using rmagic…

Martin Wawrusch wrote in post #1018103:

Works very well.

Not for this guy:

http://www.ruby-forum.com/topic/2394982#new

I just tried it this morning actually …

When you Install XCode, you have to “install” it from the App Store, THEN go to /Applications/Install XCode and double click that icon. (So basically you install it twice, the first time you “install” the installer, and then you run the installer.)

I wasn’t able to get passenger 3.0.8 to work with the fresh copy of Apache in Lion. When I go to my “xyz.local” domain name in my browser, the request isn’t passed to my local box (nothing comes in the apache access_log), so I think maybe I didn’t set up passenger correctly with Apache 2. Still working on that part…

Hi,

My Snow Leopard just let me down and now it could be a "good" moment to
upgrade to Lion.

But I'm not sure is it an option yet.
I would be using Rails 3.0.9, Ruby 1.9.2 via RVM. Postgresql DB. And
probably some stuff via homebrew. Git, Versions and that type of stuff.

Are the lights red for Lion since it is so fresh?

No problems for me.

Fred

It’s been much better than the Snow Leopard experience. Pretty clean overall, got pow up and running with rvm without issues. Not using postgres, though, so I can’t comment on that. Very happy with the upgrade!

I just tried it this morning actually …

When you Install XCode, you have to “install” it from the App Store, THEN go to /Applications/Install XCode and double click that icon. (So basically you install it twice, the first time you “install” the installer, and then you run the installer.)

Jason, this isn’t correct. When you install any application from the Mac App Store, there is no need to install a second time.

I wasn’t able to get passenger 3.0.8 to work with the fresh copy of Apache in Lion. When I go to my “xyz.local” domain name in my browser, the request isn’t passed to my local box (nothing comes in the apache access_log), so I think maybe I didn’t set up passenger correctly with Apache 2. Still working on that part…

Next, I was able to get passenger 3.0.8 installed with zero issues. Furthermore, I was able to use both passenger as well as the passenger development client successfully on Lion.

-Conrad

Hi,

My Snow Leopard just let me down and now it could be a “good” moment to

upgrade to Lion.

How did Mac OS 10.6 let you down? It worked great for me prior to installing

Mac OS 10 .7 as far as Rails is concerned.

But I’m not sure is it an option yet.

I would be using Rails 3.0.9, Ruby 1.9.2 via RVM. Postgresql DB. And

probably some stuff via homebrew. Git, Versions and that type of stuff.

Are the lights red for Lion since it is so fresh?

Any experiences?

I have been working with Lion for several months now without any issues that

effects Rails or its dependent software.

Good luck,

-Conrad

For most application's that's true, but a couple of Apple products on the Mac App Store (e.g. Xcode, OS X Lion) only give you an installer, which you have to run manually. These products need to write files outside of /Applications, and the Mac App Store can't do that by itself.

Chris

I have used http://eddorre.com/posts/rails-ultimate-install-guide-on-os-x-lion-using-rvm-homebrew-and-pow
and it was great to go from vanilla Lion to working GIT/Rails.

I did have some issues with RVM and Rails 3.1, but that is another
topic, and perhaps related to RVM not Lion.

Chris M. wrote in post #1018217:

For most application's that's true, but a couple of Apple products on
the Mac App Store (e.g. Xcode, OS X Lion) only give you an installer,
which you have to run manually. These products need to write files
outside of /Applications, and the Mac App Store can't do that by itself.

You mean the Mac App Store WON'T install outside of /Applications. This
is by design.

Besides, how is this drastically different than installing Xcode before
it was on the Mac App Store? You would download the Xcode installer and
then run the installer. The Xcode installer includes multiple
applications. There's Xcode, Instruments and an array of other utility
apps. If Xcode where to be installed like any other Mac App Store app
then each individual app would have to be installed separately, which
would be a PITA.

I somewhat understand the concern about needing to keep the installer
package hanging around on the drive. However, I don't see another way to
provide delta updates for a tool suite like Xcode. Any system capable of
running the latest version of Xcode most likely has a fairly substantial
amount of disk space anyway. It'll get to a point where we won't even
think about a 3 or 4 GB file. It'll just be another one of the already
millions of files on our drives we don't think twice about.

On Mac OS X there has always been two basic types of application
installations. Some apps don't need an installer package, some do. The
difference with the Mac App Store is that in order for third-parties to
be able to sell through the Mac App Store the app must support the
"drag-and-drop" style application install. This is safer, and easier to
control.

Third parties building apps that require installer packages will have to
resort to traditional methods of distribution. In some cases (e.g.
iWork) the requirement for an installer package can be eliminated by
separating the suite into individual applications.

If you just do the installation from the Mac App Store, you have no "make" command available in your terminal (I restarted my terminal and rebooted my machine and everything). You have to actually run the installer by double clicking /Applications/Install XCode to get the compiler installed on your machine. Until you do you will get "command not found" when you try to "make" something

Jason Fb wrote in post #1018284:

If you just do the installation from the Mac App Store, you have no
"make" command available in your terminal (I restarted my terminal and
rebooted my machine and everything). You have to actually run the
installer by double clicking /Applications/Install XCode to get the
compiler installed on your machine. Until you do you will get "command
not found" when you try to "make" something

That's just word play. Yes the button on the Mac App Store may say
"Install", but in the case of Xcode (and Mac OS X 10.7 - Lion) it really
means "Download." And, since the Mac App Store is designed to put things
ONLY in /Applications that just happens to be the download folder for
those installer packages. You are still not installing Xcode twice. You
are downloading the installer and installing Xcode once.