Best IDE for Ruby

What is the best IDE for Ruby on Windows?

gvim

obviously :slight_smile:

I don't know about just Ruby, but for Rails, I'm using both Eclipse with
the RadRails plugin and RadRails as a standalone. Pretty similar either
way, Eclipse has support for other languages and plugins, the standalone
does not.

I'm really jealous of all those screencasts of TextMate though. Anyone
want to port it to windows? =)

Kesav wrote:

is eclipse free?

eclipse is free.
I heard about this on the ruby ion rails podcast
http://www.projectrideme.com/

"RIDE-ME is geared primarily toward developers who are migrating from
a Microsoft development platform. The familiar Visual Studio feel
should make ASP .NET to Rails converts right at home."

although i have not used it or seen any reviews on it.

hth
John

Yes, it's free. It's a java app, and comes with support for Java. To do
rails, you have to download the radrails plugin.
www.eclipse.org

analyst wrote:

RadRails is a good IDE. I would suggest starting out with the Ruby
Easy Eclipse distro and then upgrading to the latest RadRails using
Eclipse's upgrade tools. Easy Eclipse gives you a couple of extra
goodies that the standalone RadRails doesn't. My personal favorite is
the refresh button on the Navigator view.

i don't know why really... but i use SciTe on any OS (ya ya, TextMate
is god.. not on the MAC :slight_smile: )
it is simple, easy, and has no suicidal moves like RadRails...

The best IDE for Ruby on Windows is don't use Windows.

Louis Simoneau wrote:

The best IDE for Ruby on Windows is don't use Windows.

This isn't IGN where you can "star farm" by increasing your post count.
Kindly piss off, eh?

Regarding the best IDE for Windows, I'm having pretty decent success
with Komodo. Often, I will use emacs via a PuTTY session, also.

A fully tooled up jEdit makes for the most TextMate-like experience
and a great Ruby IDE. You'll need some of the essential plugins,
though, such as:

* Ruby Editor Plugin [http://rubyjedit.org/]
* SuperAbbrevs [http://community.jedit.org/?q=node/view/2761]
* BufferTabs [http://plugins.jedit.org/plugins/?BufferTabs]
* Fastopen [http://plugins.jedit.org/plugins/?FastOpen]
* ProjectViewer [http://plugins.jedit.org/plugins/?ProjectViewer]
* XML [http://plugins.jedit.org/plugins/?XML]
* Console [http://plugins.jedit.org/plugins/?Console]
* Recent Buffer Switcher
[http://plugins.jedit.org/plugins/?RecentBufferSwitcher]
* EditorScheme [http://plugins.jedit.org/plugins/?EditorScheme]

You might want to download a syntax colour scheme to suits your tastes:
  http://community.jedit.org/?q=filestore/browse/22

Here's a screencast of SuperAbbrevs in action:
  http://we-knowhow.dk/jedit/demo.html

The model/controller switcher macro comes in handy too:
  http://community.jedit.org/?q=node/view/2787

The killer feature in jEdit is its plugins and flexibility. It's like
the Firefox of editors.

Here's someone else's perspective:
  http://dovetailcomputing.com/blog/2006/09/18/using-jedit-for-ruby-on-rails/

HTH,

Charles

cant't understand this textmate hype. for sure its a great editor.
but great editors are present on other platforms for a long long time.
but thats another topic.

i think radrails is a great tool for nix and win developers.

if yuo like the textmate look and feel, take a look here:
http://drnicwilliams.com/2006/08/08/textmate-theme-for-radrails/

if you like the textmate templates, take a look here:
http://devillecompanies.org/2006/10/08/radrails-textmate-templates/

the only contra is the memory consumption of radrails. but ok, its an
ide not an editor. :wink:

another nice feature is the eclipse given plugin capability.
you should download aptana and integrate radrails as plugin. really
great.

add other plugins as needed. so i think the best IDE on all systems is
RadRails.
hope for more RadRails features to come.

cheers

I have used Eclipse which is a must for Java development, but I haven’t missed it when doing Ruby or Rails, everything is just simpler, I don’t need it.

I used to really like jEdit, great regular expression support, syntax highlighting, folding, good xml editing, etc.

I still prefer the power that is emacs. Emacs feels closer to the OS and I love being able to use a shell right from in emacs, its lighter weight than the other things and doesn’t require java to be installed. It also is available on most unix systems that I log into (as well as having a port for windows and every other OS), so I am right at home where ever I am. It has been around forever and for good reason, it gets the job done and is infinitely customizable.

I won’t say that I’ll never go back to using a heavier IDE, they have their uses, but for everyday work right now in Ruby and Rails, emacs gets it done.

Jeff

Jose,

thx for the tip. but i'm looking everyday at radrails.org :slight_smile:
and i'm waiting every day for the new release. :wink:

they are doing a great job.

Jose Pepe schrieb:

i know this thread is kinda old, but you could check out scribes.
scribes has editable snippets like in the text mate vids. i like it a
lot. Scite would be my second favorite

sk