Is this book dated?

http://apress.com/book/view/9781590597811

I acquired this book and it has the info I thought I wanted; but, I’m not sure.

Is there something better more current out there? RESTful oath openid etc…

I’m coming from a wordpress to cake, codeigniter tinkering and forget why I tried rails; but, it seems pretty cool and intuitive.

Appreciate the Capistrano rec prior. Super good, like a dream come true. Was able to deploy wp with it.

Also

Would you all recommend aptana radRails?

I’m using vim & gEdit…they seem fitting.

Thoughts please.

Thank you.

http://apress.com/book/view/9781590597811

I acquired this book and it has the info I thought I wanted; but, I'm not
sure.

Well it does look a bit long in the tooth - The publication date is
given as oct 2007, shortly before the release of rails 2.0 and quite a
lot has changed since then

Fred

I know, I didn’t notice the date until…now.

Good thing I didn’t pay for it; but, it was new on the shelf at the bookstore. Mislead. Capistrano deployment should vaporize all unnecessary literature on the shelfs as well…

That would be nice if you could link the iPad or any and all other docs…so many ancient relics out their to sift through.

Any baby teeth recommendations for an eager beaver? I’m willing to learn and not looking to take over.

This was actually the book I have:

http://apress.com/book/view/1590599942

The "classic" book for learning rails is "Agile Web Development with
Rails", now in its fourth edition:

http://www.pragprog.com/titles/rails4/agile-web-development-with-rails

Thank you, appreciate it.

I’ll read along, I just installed 3.0 and 1.9

That took some doing as well.

Angel Marquez wrote:
[...]

Would you all recommend aptana radRails?

No. Rails doesn't benefit from the use of an IDE. Just use a good text
editor.

I'm using vim & gEdit..they seem fitting.

Yeah, that may be better. Personally, I'm fond of KomodoEdit.

Thoughts please.

Thank you.

<standard-newbie-questions>
You are using test-first development and version control, right?
</standard-newbie-questions>

Best,

I really liked "Simply Rails 2" by Patrick Lenz. It's the only rails
book where I went through all the code examples.

As far as an IDE goes - I like Netbeans. You can code with a simple
editor but nothing beats the view Netbeans gives you.

Bb Serviss wrote:

I really liked "Simply Rails 2" by Patrick Lenz. It's the only rails
book where I went through all the code examples.

I haven't read that book, but based on all the technical errors in
another one of Patrick's Rails books (Building Your Own RoR Web
Applications), I'd tend to steer well clear of any of his Rails writing.

As far as an IDE goes - I like Netbeans. You can code with a simple
editor but nothing beats the view Netbeans gives you.

NetBeans is a great IDE, but I do not believe it offers any advantage at
all for Rails development (I use it for other stuff). What do you mean
by "the view NetBeans gives you"?

Best,

i’

Sorry but the advice to "don't use an IDE because Rails doesn't need
one" is as dated as this book.

Today's IDEs give you significant advantages over a text editor, to
name but a few:

Visual debugging.
No Rails configuration required, already understands the Rails
structure for easy navigation.
Integration with Rspec et al; run tests with a click, visual debug
again, etc.
Integration with Git; browse your changes, 1-click to diff, etc.

Netbeans is good I agree (plus has an awesome flawless Vim plugin),
but I now use RubyMine which is better (although the Vim plugin
blows), but it's not free though.

I don’t know man. I used to work with these two dev guys that would debate constantly over cygwin and eclipse. Personally at the time (bout a year ago) I used both for whatever worked best for my understanding at the time. I do find myself leaning towards the command line more these days. The only reason I like gEdit opposed to vim is because of the file browser side pane. But, to each his own. I prefer IDEs like training wheels. They help me understand concepts more easily. The terminal with a semi transparent background is looking pretty slick and not very cluttered on F13. The only real problems I’m running into are compatibility issues and I don’t think either the cl or the IDE would remedy those more favorably.

i’ll check out rubymine. I like looking at different UI designs for this stuff anyways and can use without marrying.

danka!

I agree the file browser side pane is nice.

If you like Vim and just want a side pane then go for Netbeans with
the Vim plugin:
http://jvi.sourceforge.net/

It works 100% like regular Vim, quite amazing how good it is actually.

I am currently reading this one:
http://www.pragprog.com/titles/rails3/agile-web-development-with-rails-third-edition
it helped me to build a webshop from totally 0! :slight_smile:

But as someone else also suggested, the 4th edition coming soon:
http://www.pragprog.com/titles/rails4/agile-web-development-with-rails
(they wrote in October, and they won't be late I think!)

and it is about Rails 3! :slight_smile:

It also helps me to get involved into this agile method. Also their
other books are similar in this point, for example using Github is
only 150 pages or like that, and extremely useful, alos for a beginner
like me, absolutely understandable!

Best wishes, hope you also share your opininon /advice what to read!
thx,
gezope

Ginty wrote:

Sorry but the advice to "don't use an IDE because Rails doesn't need
one" is as dated as this book.

I try an IDE for Rails about once a year -- precisely so I don't get
stuck on dated advice. Inevitably, I go back to KomodoEdit.

I use NetBeans for JRuby/Monkeybars development. I love it for that,
but it is completely inappropriate for Rails work.

Today's IDEs give you significant advantages over a text editor, to
name but a few:

Visual debugging.

Doesn't seem to work in NetBeans.

No Rails configuration required, already understands the Rails
structure for easy navigation.

That's one of the few things I miss about Aptana, but it's not a big
enough advantage to put up with the rest.

Integration with Rspec et al; run tests with a click, visual debug
again, etc.

I run tests with *no* clicks (with autospec in the shell). I don't need
an IDE for that.

Integration with Git; browse your changes, 1-click to diff, etc.

NetBeans' Git plugin is great (except for some annoying bugs), but
except for the cute mouseover diffs, Komodo + GitX is at least as good a
combination.

Netbeans is good I agree (plus has an awesome flawless Vim plugin),
but I now use RubyMine which is better (although the Vim plugin
blows), but it's not free though.

I won't pay for a text editor or an IDE. There are so many good free
tools that it seems silly.

Best,

About RadRails:

Why should I spend my time with syntax controlling, checking, if I
should spend my time with the customer? I think it is agile attitude,
right? :slight_smile:

I use RadRails as an Eclipse plugin (for free), and it helps a lot!
Mostly if you are not a real expert, many helpful features, text high-
lighting. Maybe basic stuff, but also terminal, project viewer
included, so I do not need to change the window 4 times if I change a
little chunk of code, or I do not miss to restart the server... Later
it will help me in refactoring, if I need, and many other little
stuff. It was a good choice I must say!

But: I also tried NetBeans, and its Rails plugin. The same, I think
that is also terrific! :slight_smile:

Give them a try, these are free,
and never believe those, who wants to work too much! :wink:
gezope

Zoltan Gero wrote:

About RadRails:

Why should I spend my time with syntax controlling, checking, if I
should spend my time with the customer? I think it is agile attitude,
right? :slight_smile:

Any good editor does syntax highlighting and project viewing. You don't
need an IDE to get those features.

Best,

-1
Yes it does (in mine at least - Netbeans 6.8 on Ubuntu 9.04, 10.04 and
WindowsXP). IIRC You need to install the "fast debugger" and set a
couple of properties on the project, but then you have the ease of
breakpoints (including conditional breakpoints) and all the other
standard visual debugging tools (apart from an "immediates" window to
evaluate expressions on the fly, but you can fudge that in the main
code window...).

The only apparent absence is "break on exception", although the
Netbeans release notes say it's in there, I've never gotten it working
with Ruby.

Exactly.

If TextMate is the tool that works for you (and you can try it out for 30 days) and makes you more productive and more comfortable at your job, not willing to spend $50 is just foolish to say the least. I bought a license with my own money, not one that the company I work for paid, simply because it’s a very good tool and I didn’t enjoy the other ones I tried (and I tried a lot of them). If you’re going to develop Rails apps and get paid for it, not willing to spend $50 on a productivity tool… what are you thinking?

Best regards

Peter De Berdt

But if it isn't the tool that works for you, then it's foolish to pay
$50 for it.

Arguing over "which text editor is best" is like arguing over "who's
wife is most beautiful"... and disagreeing with someone else's opinion
is almost as rude :wink: