Creating a Dynamic/Custom form

I am pretty new at rails and seem to be stuck on an issue.

Trying to find a way to get me app admin to create a form on our rails
app. These would include:
- Select form control type
- Select required validation
- Select price change if selected

How should I even start going at this?

I am pretty new at rails and seem to be stuck on an issue.

Trying to find a way to get me app admin to create a form on our rails
app. These would include:
- Select form control type

What is a form control type?

- Select required validation

What does that mean

- Select price change if selected

Don't understand that either, sorry.
In fact I don't understand what you mean by the app admin *creating* a form.

Colin

What is a form control type?

> - Select required validation

What does that mean

> - Select price change if selected

Don't understand that either, sorry.
In fact I don't understand what you mean by the app admin *creating* a form.

Hi Colin, sorry I am probably not using proper terminology. I have a
subdomin type rails application. I am trying to get the administrator
users of the subdomain account to create an HTML form, something
similar to phpform.org.

Roger

Can anyone shed some details or point me in the correct direction?

In a nutshell I am trying to get the users in my app to create and use
web forms. I found a great jQuery example, I just have no idea how-to
save the form structure to db then render it and saving users answers/
options to the rendered form.

Roger

Not sure if it’s the best way, but here’s an idea. For each custom
form, use some combination of serialized db fields (one to hold the
form meta-data (field-types, field names, etc.) and a corresponding
field to hold the data.

Garrett Lancaster

compose-unknown-contact.jpg

Garrett Lancaster wrote in post #975922:

Not sure if it's the best way, but here's an idea. For each custom form,
use some combination of serialized db fields (one to hold the form
meta-data (field-types, field names, etc.) and a corresponding field to
hold the data.

If you're using a relational database, I think it would actually be
better to have Form, Field, ValueSet, and Value models (and associated
tables):

class Form < AR::B
  has_many :fields
  has_many :records

class Field < AR::B
  belongs_to :form
  has_many :values

class Record < AR::B
  belongs_to :form
  # maybe belongs_to :user or something
  has_many :values

class Value < AR::B
  belongs_to :field
  belongs_to :record

(Record is my ad-hoc term for one user's response, filling in all form
fields. There may be a better name. Also, some :throughs in there may
make life easier, depending on the use case.)

This might be a good candidate for a non-relational solution such as
MongoDB.

Garrett Lancaster

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote in post #975923:

Garrett Lancaster wrote in post #975922:

Not sure if it's the best way, but here's an idea. For each custom form,
use some combination of serialized db fields (one to hold the form
meta-data (field-types, field names, etc.) and a corresponding field to
hold the data.

If you're using a relational database, I think it would actually be
better to have Form, Field, ValueSet, and Value models (and associated
tables):

Er, sorry. I changed ValueSet to Record and missed that instance.

Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote in post #975923:
If you're using a relational database, I think it would actually be
better to have Form, Field, ValueSet, and Value models (and associated
tables)
I would agree, especially if you're going to use this concept in a

variety of circumstances. If it’s just one customization on one
model then I might be inclined to go the other way in some cases.
Debatable.

Garrett Lancaster

compose-unknown-contact.jpg

postbox-contact.jpg

Thanks I am going to give that a try.