What can my user's users do for me in a multitenant multiuser blog

Unless i’m gonna show my ads on their pages what can my user’s users do for me in a multi tenant multi user blog in terms of monetizing

The whole point of software as a service is that your users pay you to be on your platform. Ads don't enter into it. You provide a full-featured set of tools for blogging, and they pay you for the convenience of using it. You improve that service over time, and they continue to pay you for it.

One of the features you may provide is a one-click way to add ads to *their* blog, and choose which ads are appropriate for *their* audience. If you write that tool, and make it easy to use (and profitable for *your* users), then they will continue to pay you for the privilege of using your platform. Ideally, you should not be getting any bit of their ad revenue (except some transaction fee, if you manage the money for them). Neither should you be putting your ads (which make sense for you) into their blog (which you have never even seen, so how could you find appropriate ads?).

If you do this right, then your users will make more money in ads (or at least break even) than they pay you for the service (or at least break even). If you have priced your service correctly, then your customers will not feel as though they are being ripped off, and will think that the price they pay for the convenience is worthwhile.

Walter

To get money from users I’d do a different type of site like an auction, marketplace or ecommerce site I don’t expect anyone to pay me to use a blogging platform Do tumblr users pay for the service or get it free?

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> Unless i'm gonna show my ads on their pages what can my user's users do for me in a multi tenant multi user blog in terms of monetizing

The whole point of software as a service is that your users pay you to be on your platform. Ads don't enter into it. You provide a full-featured set of tools for blogging, and they pay you for the convenience of using it. You improve that service over time, and they continue to pay you for it.

One of the features you may provide is a one-click way to add ads to *their* blog, and choose which ads are appropriate for *their* audience. If you write that tool, and make it easy to use (and profitable for *your* users), then they will continue to pay you for the privilege of using your platform. Ideally, you should not be getting any bit of their ad revenue (except some transaction fee, if you manage the money for them). Neither should you be putting your ads (which make sense for you) into their blog (which you have never even seen, so how could you find appropriate ads?).

If you do this right, then your users will make more money in ads (or at least break even) than they pay you for the service (or at least break even). If you have priced your service correctly, then your customers will not feel as though they are being ripped off, and will think that the price they pay for the convenience is worthwhile.

Walter

To get money from users I'd do a different type of site like an auction, marketplace or ecommerce site I don't expect anyone to pay me to use a blogging platform Do tumblr users pay for the service or get it free?

I don't know. It's just that when you start talking about multi-tenant software, my mind goes to other problems that pattern solves, which all tend to be pay-to-use.

If you want to make a Tumblr clone, then you could just add a wrapper layout around all published blogs, and your ads would appear there. Depending on how you structure your layout and templates, that could mean header, footer, skyscrapers, almost anything except inserted within the body of the user's content. And if you control the rendering, I suppose you could even break out their content by major blocks (paragraphs, sections, whatever they use to divide their content) and insert an ad every N of those. Nokogiri is how I would do that.

How invasive you get here has to do with what sort of "free" your users are willing to put up with, I would say. If Tumblr adds a header and footer ad, and doesn't share the revenue, then that's one kind. YouTube lets content creators monetize in various ways, some of which they share with the creators, and some of which they don't, including popover ads and other nastiness that I keep removing with browser plugins. :sunglasses:

If you write the blogging engine yourself, then you have access to all of these parts and can do pretty much whatever you want. If you're trying to coerce a blog-in-a-box gem to do this, then you'll probably have to start by reading all the code to that gem, find out where it gets it layouts and templates and partials from, and start adding those to your parent application one at a time until you find the lever you need. And if you can't get it from there, try raising an issue on that gem's Github project.

Walter

Tumblr lets their users create single or multi user blogs?

I was thinking there may be a lot of blogging platforms but not a lot of multi user blogging platforms