Ruby On Rails Tutorial for Mac?

Hi,

I'm trying to learn how to use Rails on a Mac. Can anyone possibly
point me to a free online tutorial that walks me through all the steps
of installation and setup of each and every relevant technology,
including MySQL?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

My Best,

Frank

http://hivelogic.com/articles/ruby-rails-leopard

http://hivelogic.com/articles/ruby-rails-mongrel-mysql-osx

Hi,

I’m trying to learn how to use Rails on a Mac. Can anyone possibly

point me to a free online tutorial that walks me through all the steps

of installation and setup of each and every relevant technology,

including MySQL?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

My Best,

Frank

Frank, you can use the following link:

http://guides.rails.info

Good luck,

-Conrad

Thanks everyone. I'll check them out.

My Best,

Frank

Frank Guerino wrote:

Thanks everyone. I'll check them out.

My Best,

Frank

I'm also in the process of teaching myself RoR. See if
http://www.learningrails.com helps. There are 8 audio lessons and 15
screencasts, all for free.

Joe dude wrote:

Frank Guerino wrote:

Thanks everyone. I'll check them out.

My Best,

Frank

I'm also in the process of teaching myself RoR. See if
http://www.learningrails.com helps. There are 8 audio lessons and 15
screencasts, all for free.

What I'm looking for is a complete, step by step guide that walks you
through everything you'll need...

Ruby
RubyGems
Ruby On Rails
Apache
Mongrel
MySQL
Etc.

...how to install each and every component
...how to appropriately instantiate each and every component
...how to develop a simple Rails app
...how to deploy a Rails app to the instantiated infrastructure
...how to execute it
...all for the Mac

It seems like no matter what tutorial I look at, there is a piece of the
puzzle that's missing or confused. For example, the articles on
Hivelogic talk about compiling all my source code. I don't really want
to do that. All I want to do is install everything. Know I have the
right versions and a complete infrastructure. Know how to build an app
and deploy it. Learn how the Rails app works and interacts with each
piece of the infrastructure.

Thanks,

Frank

Frank Guerino wrote:

What I'm looking for is a complete, step by step guide that walks you
through everything you'll need...

Ruby
RubyGems
Ruby On Rails
Apache
Mongrel
MySQL
Etc.

...how to install each and every component
...how to appropriately instantiate each and every component
...how to develop a simple Rails app
...how to deploy a Rails app to the instantiated infrastructure
...how to execute it
...all for the Mac
Frank

Did you even go to the page on http://www.learningrails.com that showed
the list of lessons they have to offer... ?

Joe dude wrote:

Check out some of my bookmarks:
http://delicious.com/jaql/ruby
http://delicious.com/jaql/ruby+rails
http://delicious.com/jaql/ruby+rails+mysql
http://delicious.com/jaql/ruby+rails+osx

If all else fails:
http://tinyurl.com/yfvyc8x

Thanks very much! It looks like a very good source. I'll add it to my
list.

Frank

Marcello Parra wrote:

http://hivelogic.com/articles/ruby-rails-leopard

http://hivelogic.com/articles/ruby-rails-mongrel-mysql-osx

Please do not use these tutorials for getting started with Rails on
Leopard or Snow Leopard. They would have you install fresh copies of
Ruby, Rubygems and Rails despite the fact that the Mac OS developer
tools include perfectly good versions of Ruby and Rubygems. For most
people, Hivelogic's instructions are silly, pointless, and wasteful.

If you have the Mac OS X developer tools installed, then you have Ruby
1.8.7. To get recent versions of Rubygems and Rails, just do
sudo gem update --system
and
sudo gem install rails

The one thing that Hivelogic's tutorials might be useful for is
installing mySQL (but I'd urge you to use PostgreSQL instead -- it's a
better DB).

On Tue, Oct 27, 2009 at 9:43 PM, Frank Guerino <

Best,

Frank Guerino wrote:
[...]

What I'm looking for is a complete, step by step guide that walks you
through everything you'll need...

Ruby
RubyGems
Ruby On Rails

These are included with Mac OS dev tools, as I explained in my earlier
post.

Apache

You don't need Apache for Rails development, but anyway, it's included
in Mac OS.

Mongrel

Installed automatically with Rails.

MySQL

See Hivelogic or any of the other myriad installation guides.

Etc.

...how to install each and every component
...how to appropriately instantiate each and every component
...how to develop a simple Rails app
...how to deploy a Rails app to the instantiated infrastructure
...how to execute it
...all for the Mac

http://guides.rails.info
http://www.railscasts.com

It seems like no matter what tutorial I look at, there is a piece of the
puzzle that's missing or confused. For example, the articles on
Hivelogic talk about compiling all my source code. I don't really want
to do that. All I want to do is install everything. Know I have the
right versions and a complete infrastructure. Know how to build an app
and deploy it. Learn how the Rails app works and interacts with each
piece of the infrastructure.

Follow the recommendations in this and my previous post, and you'll be
able to do just that!

Thanks,

Frank

Best,

First, I would highly recommend purchasing the book, "Programming Ruby
1.9" because you will need a reasonably good foundation of the
language of Rails. Second, I would recommend getting the book, "Agile
Web Development with Rails 3ed" because it includes a step by step
tutorial and a reference section. In short, you'll have to invest
some time in finding these and other resources yourself and try to
show a bit of appreciation when people go out their way to assist you.

Good luck,

-Conrad

Conrad Taylor wrote:

First, I would highly recommend purchasing the book, "Programming Ruby

1.9" because you will need a reasonably good foundation of the

language of Rails. Second, I would recommend getting the book, "Agile

Web Development with Rails 3ed" because it includes a step by step

tutorial and a reference section. In short, you’ll have to invest

some time in finding these and other resources yourself and try to

show a bit of appreciation when people go out their way to assist you.

Good luck,

-Conrad

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 27, 2009, at 6:21 PM, Frank Guerino

<rails-mailing-list@andreas-s.net

Hi Conrad,

Thanks for the references. I’m doing my best to look at as many as I

can. The real issue is there are so many to look into. The reason for

coming here and asking everyone for their opinion on the best references

is for the same reason the Ruby community believes in convention over

coding… Convention comes from other people’s experiences and I believe

I’ll learn more about the right references to look at, in a few short

conversations on the forum than I will going out and randomly looking

for and reading things on my own. Why waste the time when there are

many brilliant people that have already suffered the same problem.

As for your comment on showing a bit of appreciation when people go out

of their way to assist, I believe I was truly grateful and thanked those

who helped, as can be witnessed above. If my means of thanking others

doesn’t conform to your liking, we can always take that conversation off

line, which I always find far more mature and professional than

criticizing people publicly. After all, we’re all just looking for help

or ways of helping others.

There’s no need to take the thread off line because others will learn from the

information here. Anyway, I would recommend taking in this information in

small digestible chunks. For example, http://guides.rails.info or http://guides.rubyonrails.org

will be the most current information on rails because it’s kept pretty much in sync with the state

of the released Rails API. Next, I would recommend working on self generated projects to

enforce the learning of the material. Last but not least, get comfortable with things going wrong

and troubleshooting issues.

Good luck,

-Conrad