Ruby on Rails + Flash Application ?

Hello,

I'm a Ruby on Rails beginner, as well as Flash beginner..
Recently started developing a Web application using Ruby on Rails
(I'm using InstantRails on Windows..)..
Few days ago the Application's design was changed and now the
requirement is a Flash-based Web Application.

Now, this brings me to ask a few question:

* Can I develop an entire ROR Application with Flash?
* How complex would such a thing be, if possible?
* Is it realistic at all? I mean.. currently I'm using a few plugins
(for example - for authentication, authorization..) -
can I keep their functionality while fully-integrating Flash?
* Are there any materials I should look on?

* In case it's not a realistic goal (which might be the case here) -
What tools can I use to create a "Flashy" design feel to the Web App
(buttons, menus, etc)?
Can I partially integrate Flash into my App?
Are there any recommended Plugins/Gems for it?

* Can CSS along with maybe partial flash-integration (assuming it's
possible, not too complex and that there are supportive tools around I
can use) -
supply me with such a wanted design "feel"?

* Any other recommendations? Experiences you can share?

Thanks :slight_smile:

(And hope my question wasn't too clueless..)

tino.

TINODEV wrote:

Hello,

I'm a Ruby on Rails beginner, as well as Flash beginner..
Recently started developing a Web application using Ruby on Rails
(I'm using InstantRails on Windows..)..
Few days ago the Application's design was changed and now the
requirement is a Flash-based Web Application.

Now, this brings me to ask a few question:

* Can I develop an entire ROR Application with Flash?

Sure. But why would you want to? Flash presents serious usability
problems for mobile, iPad, and visually impaired users.

* How complex would such a thing be, if possible?
* Is it realistic at all? I mean.. currently I'm using a few plugins
(for example - for authentication, authorization..) -
can I keep their functionality while fully-integrating Flash?

Yes.

* Are there any materials I should look on?

It's really no different from creating any other Web application, except
that your views, instead of being HTML, will be JSON or XML that the
Flash file can process.

* In case it's not a realistic goal (which might be the case here) -
What tools can I use to create a "Flashy" design feel to the Web App
(buttons, menus, etc)?

JavaScript. I'd highly recommend going this route instead of straight
Flash.

Can I partially integrate Flash into my App?
Are there any recommended Plugins/Gems for it?

You don't need any.

* Can CSS along with maybe partial flash-integration (assuming it's
possible, not too complex and that there are supportive tools around I
can use) -
supply me with such a wanted design "feel"?

Yes. Again, you probably don't need any Flash at all.

* Any other recommendations? Experiences you can share?

Thanks :slight_smile:

(And hope my question wasn't too clueless..)

tino.

Best,

flash and rails . . .
  Flexible Rails
  Flex 3 on Rails 2
  http://www.manning.com/armstrong/

I used to use instant rails but dropped that a while ago.
I develop on windows :-/
I wrote post on windows and rails installation.
http://johnivanoff.blogspot.com/2010/03/new-ruby-on-rails-setup-on-windows-xp.html

I've started using rails 3 beta and like it a lot better that 2.
I know there's not a lot of tutorials using rails 3 but there is some
good documentation on it. http://guides.rails.info/3_0_release_notes.html

http://railscasts.com/ has great screen casts too.

Also a good book is Agile Web Development with Rails, 4th Edition
http://pragprog.com/titles/rails4/agile-web-development-with-rails

a some stuff you learn rails 2 will have to be unlearned in rails 3.

but use what you need to get the site going.

Cheers,
John

Many thanks for the answers :slight_smile:

@ Marnen - Appreciate your advice and recommendations as for
JavaScript..
I assume you mean JavaScript / Ajax?
Anyway, I'll look into it in more depth...

@john - thanks:)
looked into the links you gave me..
I was reading a bit before sending my question.. saw mentions of
"Flex" around, though had the impression adobe replaced their flex
builder with flah builder 4.. (hmm.. might have connect here a few
unconnected issues.. Flex will forgive me if this is the case)

As for InstantRails - My feeling is sonner than later I'll try and
configure Rails on Windows on my own.. even if only for having a
better feeling of it and how to..
When I come to do this (unless I combine moving to Rails 3 at the same
time),
Your blog entry would be very useful :slight_smile:

Anyway, the reason I haven't moved to Rails 3 yet (though developing a
new application, no backward compatibility needed) is it's still a
beta.. I really want to go into it but need the application to be very
stable and don't have much time to play around (though anyway, I'm
learning in parallel), so am not sure I should move right now to Rails
3, unless will hear different feedbacks..
Also, now, having JavaScript in mind and my "view" requirements, maybe
Rails 3 can actually make things easier/smoother for me?

Hmm.. also, How's you experience so far using Rails 3 on Windows
(assuming you do use it on windows)?

Again - many thanks :slight_smile:

tino.

[Please quote when replying -- it makes the thread easier to follow.]

TINODEV wrote:

Many thanks for the answers :slight_smile:

@ Marnen - Appreciate your advice and recommendations as for
JavaScript..
I assume you mean JavaScript / Ajax?

I meant what I said. Use Ajax or not as your application demands.

Anyway, I'll look into it in more depth...

[...]

As for InstantRails - My feeling is sonner than later I'll try and
configure Rails on Windows on my own.. even if only for having a
better feeling of it and how to..

Why? Most Rails devs on Windows seem to use InstantRails.

When I come to do this (unless I combine moving to Rails 3 at the same
time),
Your blog entry would be very useful :slight_smile:

Anyway, the reason I haven't moved to Rails 3 yet (though developing a
new application, no backward compatibility needed) is it's still a
beta.. I really want to go into it but need the application to be very
stable and don't have much time to play around (though anyway, I'm
learning in parallel), so am not sure I should move right now to Rails
3, unless will hear different feedbacks..

I'm not sure you should either. Rails 3 has a lot of amazing features,
but it's still prerelease software, and I'm not certain that it's fully
stable yet. But do switch when it's released!

Also, now, having JavaScript in mind and my "view" requirements, maybe
Rails 3 can actually make things easier/smoother for me?

Well, Rails 2's JavaScript helpers should be entirely avoided, because
they mix JavaScript into your HTML, which is bad coding practice
(JavaScript, like CSS, really belongs in separate files from HTML). I
understand Rails 3 fixes this.

Hmm.. also, How's you experience so far using Rails 3 on Windows
(assuming you do use it on windows)?

I certainly don't use Windows, and I really don't recommend that anyone
else develop on it either. If you can't get a Mac, at least set up a
Linux VM or something. :slight_smile:

Again - many thanks :slight_smile:

tino.

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote:

TINODEV wrote:

Hello,

I'm a Ruby on Rails beginner, as well as Flash beginner..
Recently started developing a Web application using Ruby on Rails
(I'm using InstantRails on Windows..)..
Few days ago the Application's design was changed and now the
requirement is a Flash-based Web Application.

Now, this brings me to ask a few question:

* Can I develop an entire ROR Application with Flash?

Sure. But why would you want to? Flash presents serious usability
problems for mobile, iPad, and visually impaired users.

+1

Haven't you heard? Flash has passed it's prime, and is dying a slow and
painful death. I don't even consider Flash when thinking about building
web based applications anymore. Not even if I want an application on the
web that feels and acts like a desktop application. There are too many
excellent solutions today that make use of modern web standards that web
browsers can run natively without depending on plugins.

A couple of examples:
http://cappuccino.org/ # My personal favorite
http://www.sproutcore.com/
http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/ # My least favorite, but viable

The great thing about these solutions is that they don't care what's on
the server-side. At least that's the case for the first two in the list,
I am only assuming it's true for GWT, but I'm not certain.

wrote below :slight_smile:

[Please quote when replying -- it makes the thread easier to follow.]

TINODEV wrote:
> Many thanks for the answers :slight_smile:

> @ Marnen - Appreciate your advice and recommendations as for
> JavaScript..
> I assume you mean JavaScript / Ajax?

I meant what I said. Use Ajax or not as your application demands.

ammm.. ok :slight_smile:

you wrote: "JavaScript. I'd highly recommend going this route instead
of straight
Flash. "

> Anyway, I'll look into it in more depth...

[...]
> As for InstantRails - My feeling is sonner than later I'll try and
> configure Rails on Windows on my own.. even if only for having a
> better feeling of it and how to..

Why? Most Rails devs on Windows seem to use InstantRails.

Good to know.. as I'm working alone and not experienced, I didn't know
this information..

> When I come to do this (unless I combine moving to Rails 3 at the same
> time),
> Your blog entry would be very useful :slight_smile:

> Anyway, the reason I haven't moved to Rails 3 yet (though developing a
> new application, no backward compatibility needed) is it's still a
> beta.. I really want to go into it but need the application to be very
> stable and don't have much time to play around (though anyway, I'm
> learning in parallel), so am not sure I should move right now to Rails
> 3, unless will hear different feedbacks..

I'm not sure you should either. Rails 3 has a lot of amazing features,
but it's still prerelease software, and I'm not certain that it's fully
stable yet. But do switch when it's released!

I understand, this was my initial feeling though started doubting it's
relevancy..

> Also, now, having JavaScript in mind and my "view" requirements, maybe
> Rails 3 can actually make things easier/smoother for me?

Well, Rails 2's JavaScript helpers should be entirely avoided, because
they mix JavaScript into your HTML, which is bad coding practice
(JavaScript, like CSS, really belongs in separate files from HTML). I
understand Rails 3 fixes this.

Ok.. This got me a bit confused..
You recommended using JavaScript yet not moving just yet to Rails 3,
which means I'm still using Rails 2.3.5..
Thus, how should I as you see it, implement / combine Java Script in
my app?
Or maybe you just advised me in advance to separate Java Script from
the rest
of my code? ammm.. can you be more specific (hope I'm not asking too
many questions..)

> Hmm.. also, How's you experience so far using Rails 3 on Windows
> (assuming you do use it on windows)?

I certainly don't use Windows, and I really don't recommend that anyone
else develop on it either. If you can't get a Mac, at least set up a
Linux VM or something. :slight_smile:

I definitely understand..
Will move later on the my road when it's possible..

> Again - many thanks :slight_smile:

> tino.

Best,

tino

Some of are required to work on windows at work. I do have a
production Rails app running on a windows box. it's internal and
doesn't have a high hit rate so I'm ok with it. The box also runs ASP
classic on it, so it's running IIS and Apache. I like pain. At home I
use a Mac and prefer it.

I'm not going to get into a mac/win or html5/flash war. We can try to
steer our clients/boss to make better decisions. Enough on that.

Rails 3 has been very stable on my Windows machine and my Mac. I'm
even using Cucumber and rspec for BBD on rails 3.
I like how rails 3 allows you to use unobtrusive JavaScript. (http://
wetherubyists.com/blog/unobtrusive-ajax-with-rails-3)

If one plans ahead and can keep the back end separate from the front
end, you could write a desktop client, iPhone/iPad app, android app
and windows mobile app to access web services.

I know rails 3 is in beta but I would suggest going with it. I don't
know why I find it easier but I do. maybe it's because in rails 3 I'd
type

    rails g scaffold user username:string password:string
easier to type than (remember this is on windows)
    ruby script/generate scaffold user username:string password:string

I know it's not that much but it is less.
I've used rails since it's 0.9 days but in mo means a guru.

side note peepcode has some really good screen casts too http://peepcode.com/
Also noticed this website today. http://isuckatruby.com/

I also have a rails 3 "app" with Authlogic and
declarative_authorization.
Disclaimer: Not all the rspec tests have been written and I need to re-
factor all the tests. So please be kind when ripping it to shreds.
http://github.com/johnivanoff/auth_with_roles

Cheers,
John

Robert Walker wrote:
[...]

Haven't you heard? Flash has passed it's prime, and is dying a slow and
painful death.

I hope that's not true. Flash is a great tool for sites that require it
(see http://www.openstreetmap.org for an example of Flash used
appropriately -- with Rails, as it happens). But I'd estimate that well
over 90% of sites using Flash shouldn't be.

I don't even consider Flash when thinking about building
web based applications anymore. Not even if I want an application on the
web that feels and acts like a desktop application. There are too many
excellent solutions today that make use of modern web standards that web
browsers can run natively without depending on plugins.

Exactly.

A couple of examples:
http://cappuccino.org/ # My personal favorite

Really? I've heard bad things about it.

http://www.sproutcore.com/
http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/ # My least favorite, but viable

The great thing about these solutions is that they don't care what's on
the server-side. At least that's the case for the first two in the list,
I am only assuming it's true for GWT, but I'm not certain.

AFAIK, it is. GWT compiles to client-side JavaScript.

Best,

TINODEV wrote:
[...]

> Also, now, having JavaScript in mind and my "view" requirements, maybe
> Rails 3 can actually make things easier/smoother for me?

Well, Rails 2's JavaScript helpers should be entirely avoided, because
they mix JavaScript into your HTML, which is bad coding practice
(JavaScript, like CSS, really belongs in separate files from HTML). �I
understand Rails 3 fixes this.

Ok.. This got me a bit confused..
You recommended using JavaScript yet not moving just yet to Rails 3,
which means I'm still using Rails 2.3.5..
Thus, how should I as you see it, implement / combine Java Script in
my app?

Write JavaScript directly, not with Rails' helpers.

Or maybe you just advised me in advance to separate Java Script from
the rest
of my code?

Correct.

ammm.. can you be more specific (hope I'm not asking too
many questions..)

What part don't you understand?

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote:

A couple of examples:
http://cappuccino.org/ # My personal favorite

Really? I've heard bad things about it.

You forget, I also hack around at Objective C/Cocoa code, so I find
Objective-J fascinating and very cool. I'm not at all surprised you've
heard bad things about it. It's certainly not for everyone, especially
if they don't like Obj-C.

The negative, I'm sure, is amplified beyond the norm from typical
Rubists, who take issue with verbose language syntax in general. I'm
fully aware that Cappuccino will likely never become a main stream
development platform.

Hi tino,

I use Flex (don't like the Flash IDE - especially that stinking
Timeline ) with Rails all the time - no problems. Being on Windows, I
use InstantRails, and Aptana Studio as an editor, although I do as
much as I can now via the command line. I looked into Aptana due to it
being built on Eclipse the same as Flex, no other reason. I have not
had any problems so until I do, being Pragmatic :slight_smile: I'll stay as I am
for now. Though I am looking to get hold of a Mac box as soon as I
can........

Flash Builder 4 is the new Flex 3, while Flash Pro 5 is in CS5 so it
looks like Adobe will continue to improve and push Flash/Flex, I bet
there will be more to come.....

My set up is to use Flex for the front end entirely, and then Rails
for the back. All my swf's are on one server that would host the
domain, while Rails is on a cloud so I can ramp up the resources when
necessary for Rails - which is the most intensive part of the App.

I would recommend looking at Flexible Rails, and download a trial of
Flash Builder 4 to go with it - if it is the same as Flex 3, you
should get a 60 day trial rather than the usual 30. It was Flexible
Rails that got me looking at Rails in the first place, and I've loved
it ever since.

If you look into RemoteObject on the Flash side, it makes it VERY
simple to send objects to Rails via RubyAMF - get the FlexibleRails
branch from : http://rubyamf.googlecode.com/svn/branches/flexiblerails/rubyamf

One thing I did find, was that I was creating model value objects
(VO's) in actionscript that my UI would use, but they were the same as
the models in Rails. This was duplication - first I created the Rails
model, then I wrote the AS VO - which was wasting good development
time - so I wrote my first gem - but isn't really ready to post yet on
Github - it needs refactoring a little along with more useful comments
and docs). It hooks into the Rails Scaffolder and creates all my VO's
for Flex as I create my models in Rails. It also keeps a few AS
Singletons updated as necessary as I add new Models, and keeps an AS
Map file uptodate which maps singulars and plurals as well as the
belongsTo, habtm etc relationships between the AS VO's.

The VO's are sent via RemoteObject to the Rails Controller, and passed
to the relevant Rails Model for processing. It's all pretty simple
when you get the hang of it.

Personally, I wouldn't try doing anything major in the Flash IDE -
especially if you may not be the only one working on the project going
forward - Flex is far more suitable to larger projects, and multi-
developer teams.

As far as not using Flash because of iPhones etc, I guess it depends
on your target market and the application itself. Are your users going
to want to access your services from a mobile handest? I have a mobile
running Android (not the latest version) and it struggles to display e-
mails from this group, and not all web pages are viewable
(particularly from this group) - regardless of Flash content or not -
so I wouldn't make a decision on the technology used on your full
blown web site app based on the mobile market. Mobile Apps, not web
sites, are the way forward in my, very humble, view.

Instead of trying to develop one web site/application front end for
all devices, why not make your main site - the one which will do all
the attracting of customers - exactly as is required for that
particular purpose. If you then need to provide access to services for
the mobile market, create the relevant App for the relevant handset
OS. With Rails, you can create the one Application on the server, then
specific front end apps for each market you are targeting - each of
which could connect with Rails.

One final thought with regard to Flex, is that if you develop
correctly with Flex, ie re-usable code, you then build up your own
libraries of code to just drop-in future applications. I haven't
looked into Rails views at all because I have everything I need in
Flex, but from what I did read, it appears you have to create all your
views from scratch for each Rails application - that doesn't interest
me - and am happy to be corrected if wrong - I prefer to use my own
custom built AS components, controllers, managers to display and
control the view.

And just remembered you mentioned CSS - well Flex is completely CSS
compatible.

That's my 2p worth, hope you found some of it useful.

Regards

Paul

paul h wrote:

Hi tino,

I use Flex (don't like the Flash IDE - especially that stinking
Timeline ) with Rails all the time - no problems. Being on Windows, I
use InstantRails, and Aptana Studio as an editor, although I do as
much as I can now via the command line. I looked into Aptana due to it
being built on Eclipse the same as Flex, no other reason. I have not
had any problems so until I do, being Pragmatic :slight_smile: I'll stay as I am
for now.

I recommend against Aptana. It was promising, but never really
fulfilled that promise. Anyway, Rails is better without an IDE. Just
use a good text editor (I like KomodoEdit).

[...]

As far as not using Flash because of iPhones etc, I guess it depends
on your target market and the application itself. Are your users going
to want to access your services from a mobile handest? I have a mobile
running Android (not the latest version) and it struggles to display e-
mails from this group, and not all web pages are viewable
(particularly from this group) - regardless of Flash content or not -
so I wouldn't make a decision on the technology used on your full
blown web site app based on the mobile market. Mobile Apps, not web
sites, are the way forward in my, very humble, view.

I believe you are 98% wrong here. With the profusion of mobile
operating systems and browsers, it is now more important than ever to
develop in standards-compliant HTML that will work effortlessly on all
client devices.

Taking my own use case (which may or may not be typical), I do a heck of
a lot of Web browsing on my iPhone. The browser is excellent and
capable of dealing with just about any standards-compliant HTML and JS.
If your site requires me to download a special-purpose app, whereas your
competitor's works flawlessly in the Web browser, which one do you think
I'll use (hint:it won't be yours)?

Instead of trying to develop one web site/application front end for
all devices, why not make your main site - the one which will do all
the attracting of customers - exactly as is required for that
particular purpose. If you then need to provide access to services for
the mobile market, create the relevant App for the relevant handset
OS.

Hell no. There are at least 4 advanced phone operating systems one has
to develop for if one goes this route. Standards-compliant HTML works
everywhere.

With Rails, you can create the one Application on the server, then
specific front end apps for each market you are targeting - each of
which could connect with Rails.

You certainly can. But in most cases, it's probably extra work to no
real advantage.

Best,

Ok..

Took me a while to answer and try to figure out what direction was
suggested by each one of you..

Replying here in general, but referring to ideas, links and
suggestions contributed by you all, so - thanks, everyone! :slight_smile:

You all supplied me with valuable information..
Yet due to multiple opinions / suggestions / different implementation
advices,
I'm again not sure where to be heading regarding the app's UI..

As I'm developing on Windows, remarks concerning Objective-C, Cocoa,
putting Cappuccino at the same sentence.. make me think this is not
the things for me right now even if I wanted to (wish it was).. Not
sure about SproutCore.. I understand the pros and cons of using Flex/
Flash, though was nice to hear there are developers out there who do
use it (on windows), in case I do follow this direction...
After better understanding the suggestions, my tendency (or wish at
least) is to follow tools / technologies which will make my app more
likely to be accessible on most platform / following Standards-
compliant HTML..

That being said, I do need to separate between my wishes to further
study and follow your suggestions and the app's deadlines..
for the long run, I understand I should be looking into writing
JavaScript independent code myself, or try Rails 3's JavaScript
Helpers when it's stability is more probable

BUT - right now I have no JavaScript knowledge or experience.. could
learn things, but will take time - time I'm not sure I have right
now.. therefore, unless this knowledge to start things from scratch is
crucial in order to use JavaScript in my app I AM (sigh) looking for
tools / examples / advices to shorten my way to the required app's
UI..

So - basically asking here for more detailed information and/or help
if you can supply me with some...

Thanks, a lot :slight_smile:

tino.

That is not a good reason for rejecting these tools. If you decided
that this was technically the best solution (I am not saying it is)
and developing under Windows makes this difficult, then don't use
Windows.

Colin

Just my $.02 from my own experience...

If you are in the same situation I usually am in your direction will
most likely be decided for you by your boss/client, be it technology,
be it tools, be it whatever else. This will probably mean that you
will also have deadlines to fulfill. In that case I would recommend
you go with what you know or can know that will be useful and that
will make you and your project succeed. That might be using Rails
generated JS / other tools/technologies that you can use now.

Don't try to use stuff you still don't know if you are under time
constraints or you will never get there.

True, but from what I can gather, the poster doesn’t have any experience when it comes to interfacing a Rails backend with a Flash frontend. Except maybe for the bare minimum, it would still require some fairly good knowledge of ActionScript. Also, serving the data in whatever format Flash will grok, whether that’s XML or anything else, is also out of the scope of a lot of examples out there. What’s even more, due to Rails’ security measures such as the authenticity token etc, getting Flash involved also requires you to know about Rack Middlewares.

I might be wrong here, but it seems he’s saying: “I don’t know any of the tools, I’ve played around a bit with Flash and some Rails examples, but I don’t know anything. Can you advise me on something that will magically get my application done?”. To be honest, I don’t see it happening, and accepting a project with a deadline where you have no idea on how to get it started… not such a good idea. Web development is, as we all know, very challenging to get into since you need to know both serverside and clientside technology quite well. It’s not like you can jump in and expect to stay afloat if you don’t know exactly how everything ties together.

Very true, that's why I mentioned Rails generated JS because you don't
actually need to know JS to start using it if you let Rails generate
it for you. True, as Marnen mentioned the generated code is not really
pretty, but it works and if you ask a boss or customer what is that
they prefer, pretty vs. working code, I can tell you that not 100 but
200% of them will choose working. :wink:

The good thing about Rails generated JS is that there are good
tutorials and books. I personally love the Ajax on Rails book by
O'Reilly, if it's of any use to the OP.

TINODEV wrote:

Ok..

Took me a while to answer and try to figure out what direction was
suggested by each one of you..

Replying here in general, but referring to ideas, links and
suggestions contributed by you all, so - thanks, everyone! :slight_smile:

You're welcome. However, note that you seem to be going about your
technical decision process in the wrong way, and will probably wind up
in a bad place as a result.

You all supplied me with valuable information..
Yet due to multiple opinions / suggestions / different implementation
advices,
I'm again not sure where to be heading regarding the app's UI..

Then be agile and start simple. Use HTML (with JavaScript as necessary)
until you can establish that it won't do the trick.

As I'm developing on Windows, remarks concerning Objective-C, Cocoa,
putting Cappuccino at the same sentence.. make me think this is not
the things for me right now even if I wanted to (wish it was)..

Then you completely misunderstood. Cappuccino is a JavaScript framework
inspired by Obj-C. There's nothing OS-specific in it AFAIK. Really,
take the initiative and do some research!

Not
sure about SproutCore.. I understand the pros and cons of using Flex/
Flash, though was nice to hear there are developers out there who do
use it (on windows), in case I do follow this direction...
After better understanding the suggestions, my tendency (or wish at
least) is to follow tools / technologies which will make my app more
likely to be accessible on most platform / following Standards-
compliant HTML..

I think that's a good choice. But that shouldn't be surprising. :slight_smile:

That being said, I do need to separate between my wishes to further
study and follow your suggestions and the app's deadlines..
for the long run, I understand I should be looking into writing
JavaScript independent code myself, or try Rails 3's JavaScript
Helpers when it's stability is more probable

BUT - right now I have no JavaScript knowledge or experience.. could
learn things, but will take time - time I'm not sure I have right
now.. therefore, unless this knowledge to start things from scratch is
crucial in order to use JavaScript in my app I AM (sigh) looking for
tools / examples / advices to shorten my way to the required app's
UI..

You're asking the impossible. You can't write a Web app without knowing
HTML. You can't write a Rails app without knowing Ruby. You can't rely
on Rails' JavaScript helpers to keep you from learning JavaScript, any
more than you can rely on ActiveRecord to keep you from learning SQL.
If you intend to write this application, you must understand the
technologies you'll be using. There is no shortcut.

I recommend reading David Flanagan's "JavaScript: The Definitive Guide"
-- it's apparently the only JS book that actually teaches proper
programming practice -- and I've also heard good things about Doug
Crockford's "JavaScript: The Good Parts".

So - basically asking here for more detailed information and/or help
if you can supply me with some...

Thanks, a lot :slight_smile:

tino.

Best,

pepe wrote:
[...]

Very true, that's why I mentioned Rails generated JS because you don't
actually need to know JS to start using it if you let Rails generate
it for you.

No! That will only land you in trouble without you knowing enough JS to
get *out* of trouble. You have to understand what Rails is producing.

True, as Marnen mentioned the generated code is not really
pretty, but it works

It's not about pretty. It's about proper architecture. Inline JS is
improper architecture.

and if you ask a boss or customer what is that
they prefer, pretty vs. working code, I can tell you that not 100 but
200% of them will choose working. :wink:

I don't give my clients that choice. They get properly designed code
that works. It's not up to the client to make technical decisions.

The good thing about Rails generated JS is that there are good
tutorials and books. I personally love the Ajax on Rails book by
O'Reilly, if it's of any use to the OP.

What's so hard about learning JavaScript?

Best,