Noob question .each problem

This is somewhat unwieldy - why the busines with index when you could
just return correct_user ? Even better, use a method like detect - the
code above is equivalent to
user.detect {|current_user| current_user == User.encrypt(password,
current_user)}
You'll also find your code reads more easily if variables that contain
collections are pluralised (ie users = User.find :all rather than user
= User.find( :all))

This shouldn't change the result of the code however. Seems to me that
the data in your table might just be bad (or you're typing in the
wrong password) - What is the value of User.encrypted_password
( 'gica1', User.find(4).salt) ?

Having users with the same name is really rather weird - every website
I can think of requires usernames to be unique

Fred

> user.each do |correct_user|
> expected_password = User.encrypted_password(password, correct_user.salt)
> if correct_user.hashed_password == expected_password
> idx = user.index(correct_user)
> return user[idx]
> end
> end

This is somewhat unwieldy - why the busines with index when you could
just return correct_user ? Even better, use a method like detect - the
code above is equivalent to
user.detect {|current_user| current_user == User.encrypt(password,
current_user)}

the manbo jumbo with idx was that it was the only method which worked.
as you suggested, i was putting in the wrong password, and the method
did the correct this, it returned user=nil.
The name problem, was another bad thing to do, I thought about it and
it made no sense at all.Mistakenly i forgot that name was in fact the
username, and i thought that two users can have the same name and
surname, logically, but not the same username.I will create another
column with this name,username, and leave the name column alone.
Thx so much for the alternate version of my code, but i don't
understand anything, as i said, i'm a noob, been working with rails
about 3 months, and studied a nit of Ruby, about 3 chapters, about
classes, objects and stuff.maybe you could translate it a bit for me,
if you have the time, i will much appreciate it.

and this line : user.detect {|current_user| current_user ==
User.encrypt(password,current_user)}, shouldn't be something like
user.detect {|current_user| current_user == User.encrypt
(password,current_user.salt)}

You'll also find your code reads more easily if variables that contain
collections are pluralised (ie users = User.find :all rather than user
= User.find( :all))

thx so much for this tip too, it doesn't have to do anything with the
line user.detect {|current_user| current_user == User.encrypt
(password, current_user)} right?

This shouldn't change the result of the code however. Seems to me that
the data in your table might just be bad (or you're typing in the
wrong password) - What is the value of User.encrypted_password
( 'gica1', User.find(4).salt) ?

Having users with the same name is really rather weird - every website
I can think of requires usernames to be unique

Fred

thx so much for all your help,
have a Happy New Year ok? ,
sincerely,
radu

and this line : user.detect {|current_user| current_user ==
User.encrypt(password,current_user)}, shouldn't be something like
user.detect {|current_user| current_user == User.encrypt
(password,current_user.salt)}

that's right.
This means: iterate over the user collection, passing each element
into the block as current_user. return the first element for which the
condition in the block returns true.

> You'll also find your code reads more easily if variables that contain
> collections are pluralised (ie users = User.find :all rather than user
> = User.find( :all))

thx so much for this tip too, it doesn't have to do anything with the
line user.detect {|current_user| current_user == User.encrypt
(password, current_user)} right?

no. just a stylistic thing

Fred

> and this line : user.detect {|current_user| current_user ==
> User.encrypt(password,current_user)}, shouldn't be something like
> user.detect {|current_user| current_user == User.encrypt
> (password,current_user.salt)}

that's right.
This means: iterate over the user collection, passing each element
into the block as current_user. return the first element for which the
condition in the block returns true.

Sry for bothering you agan but shouldn't it be :
user.detect {|current_user| current_user.hashed_password ==
User.encrypt(password,current_user.salt)} reather than user.detect {|
current_user| current_user== User.encrypt
(password,current_user.salt)} ??.
== means a condition if i recall correctly.
because the string that comes out of User.encrypt
(password,current_user.salt)} should be compared with something in the
current_user, namely hashed_password, not the object refered by the
variable current_user, right?

> > You'll also find your code reads more easily if variables that contain
> > collections are pluralised (ie users = User.find :all rather than user
> > = User.find( :all))

> thx so much for this tip too, it doesn't have to do anything with the
> line user.detect {|current_user| current_user == User.encrypt
> (password, current_user)} right?

no. just a stylistic thing

thx again for the trick:)

Fred

much much appreciate it Fred,
regards,
radu

correct.

Fred

Problem solved!

Hi again Fred,

I tried user.detect {|current_user| current_user.hashed_password
==User.encrypt(password,current_user.salt)} and it worked like a
charm.

thx a million yet again for ALL your help,
radu