jruby here?

There is someone using jruby?
I'd like to know some experiences and some opinions about jruby on rails.

Msan Msan wrote in post #969090:

There is someone using jruby?
I'd like to know some experiences and some opinions about jruby on
rails.

I use JRuby for one non-Rails project. In most situations, I don't see
much point in using it for Rails, largely because I don't like
server-side Java deployment options.

What's your actual question?

Best,

My group uses redmine running on jruby. the glassfish gem made it
pretty trivial to set up.

  ~Rob

Rob Saul wrote in post #969117:

There is someone using jruby?
I'd like to know some experiences and some opinions about jruby on rails.

My group uses redmine running on jruby. the glassfish gem made it
pretty trivial to set up.

I had heard that. I have also heard that the glassfish gem may no
longer be being maintained...

  ~Rob

Best,

I'm using JRuby, outside Rails currently (although I know people found
it interesting to benefits from existing deployment infrastructures).

I use it mainly for:
- reliable job processing/pdf generation with Resque + Java CRM
interop (post: http://blog.logeek.fr/2010/8/2/on-jruby-resque-and-windows)
- real-time vst audio-processing (together with Mirah) (code:
https://github.com/thbar/opaz-plugdk)

best,

-- Thibaut

No specific question, I would only know some opinions about the use of jruby.
I've used ruby with rails but pretty soon I've tried jruby with rails.
I've found it much simpler to setup and upgrade, you need only the
.tar or .zip file and extract it on pc.
The deployment is very simply too, you have to create the .war file
and deploy it on tomcat or glassfish or whatever servlet container and
that's all.
Also about all the gems are supported by jruby and, not least, it run
on the jvm then it has the jvm thread support.
I think jruby is really a good choice.

Msan Msan wrote in post #969134:

Msan Msan wrote in post #969090:

There is someone using jruby?
I'd like to know some experiences and some opinions about jruby on
rails.

I use JRuby for one non-Rails project. In most situations, I don't see
much point in using it for Rails, largely because I don't like
server-side Java deployment options.

What's your actual question?

No specific question, I would only know some opinions about the use of
jruby.
I've used ruby with rails but pretty soon I've tried jruby with rails.
I've found it much simpler to setup and upgrade, you need only the
.tar or .zip file and extract it on pc.

Same for any other Ruby, particularly if you use RVM.

The deployment is very simply too, you have to create the .war file
and deploy it on tomcat or glassfish or whatever servlet container and
that's all.

I wouldn't call anything involving servlet containers "simple".
Passenger is a lot simpler.

Also about all the gems are supported by jruby

Not true. Any gem with C extensions won't run on JRuby unless the
extensions have been ported. (Last I heard, even such a well-known gem
as Nokogiri didn't work on JRuby.)

and, not least, it run
on the jvm then it has the jvm thread support.

How often do you find yourself needing this, at least for Rails?

I think jruby is really a good choice.

For some projects, yes -- I'm using it (with Monkeybars) to create a
Swing desktop application in Ruby. But I don't think I'd want to use
JRuby for a typical Rails project.

Best,

Why?

Msan Msan wrote in post #969148:

Msan Msan wrote in post #969148:

I wouldn't call anything involving servlet containers "simple".

Why?

Because in my experience, servlet containers are hard to set up
correctly, and messing around with WAR files is unneeded extra work.

They are not so hard.

Have you tried Passenger yet? It's about as easy to use as mod_php.
That's how deployment *should* be, not all that Tomcat and WAR crap.

I work with grails too.
Do you know grails?
So I need a servlet container for my grails apps, then I prefer to
have all my apps under a single container that's another reason of my
choice of jruby.

Msan Msan wrote in post #969162:

Msan Msan wrote in post #969148:

I wouldn't call anything involving servlet containers "simple".

Why?

Because in my experience, servlet containers are hard to set up
correctly, and messing around with WAR files is unneeded extra work.

They are not so hard.

But when a simpler alternative exists, why not use it? "Not so hard" is
hardly a glowing endorsement. :slight_smile:

Have you tried Passenger yet? It's about as easy to use as mod_php.
That's how deployment *should* be, not all that Tomcat and WAR crap.

I work with grails too.
Do you know grails?

No. I work with real Ruby and real Rails, not a knockoff. :smiley:

(That was admittedly snarky. I know Groovy and Grails have some
interesting features.)

So I need a servlet container for my grails apps, then I prefer to
have all my apps under a single container that's another reason of my
choice of jruby.

On the one hand, it may make sense to use your existing Java
environment. On the other hand, though...what benefits do you gain from
jumping through the extra hoops that JRuby represents?

Again, I ask: have you ever *tried* something like Passenger?

Best,

the word I got is that the jruby team will continue to
maintain it. In the last 24 hours there was a note that
version 1.0.3 will soon be available.

  ~Rob

Rob Saul wrote in post #969177:

longer be being maintained...

the word I got is that the jruby team will continue to
maintain it. In the last 24 hours there was a note that
version 1.0.3 will soon be available.

Good to know. I certainly intend to investigate glassfish if I ever
need to use JRuby for Rails.

  ~Rob

Best,

I've tried passenger time ago.
I've installed something like a apache module.

Msan Msan wrote in post #969303:

Same with Tomcat. Just copy the war file to the webapps folder and
that's it. How hard can that be?

All the best,

Fidel.

Fidel Viegas wrote in post #969315:

server like you would with PHP. Easy.

Same with Tomcat. Just copy the war file to the webapps folder and
that's it. How hard can that be?

But first you have to make the WAR file -- a totally unnecessary task
given that neither Passenger or the glassfish gem makes you do it. And
my experience with Tomcat has been that setup of Tomcat itself is not
easy, even when deploying a prepackaged WAR file.

All the best,

Fidel.

Best,

There are reasons I'd choose MRI or REE over JRuby for specific
apps, but these aren't them:

But first you have to make the WAR file -- a totally unnecessary task
given that neither Passenger or the glassfish gem makes you do it.

And yet utterly trivial to include in your Capistrano deployment script
(or alternative), so hardly a show-stopper!

my experience with Tomcat has been that setup of Tomcat itself is not
easy, even when deploying a prepackaged WAR file.

What "setup"? Untar the distribution, edit the config file if you want
other than the default ports, drop in your WAR file, start. E.Z.

But, horses for courses...

I don't really use JRuby, so I haven't had the chance to try the
glassfish gem. But I do use Grails, which generates War files, and the
process isn't any difficult. At least to me. I don't really mind
generate the war file with "grails war" and then deploy it in a
servlet container.

At the moment, I use primarily Rails with apache and passenger, but
oftentimes I do have the need to work with Java based apps, hence the
use of Grails which I find easier to deploy than JRuby on Rails. At
least, I wasn't aware of the glassfish gem and when I tried to play
with it, it generated a bunch of errors that I did not have the time
to deal with.

I read a bit about the glassfish gem and it does sound easier to deal
with, since Glassfish is integrated into the whole server stack.

Anyway... Passenger has made Rails deployment an easy process. So, on
this one, I do agree with you.

All the best,

Fidel.

Hassan Schroeder wrote in post #969321:

There are reasons I'd choose MRI or REE over JRuby for specific
apps, but these aren't them:

So what would your reasons be?

But first you have to make the WAR file -- a totally unnecessary task
given that neither Passenger or the glassfish gem makes you do it.

And yet utterly trivial to include in your Capistrano deployment script
(or alternative), so hardly a show-stopper!

Probably true. I've never made a WAR file out of a Rails application,
so I don't know if there are other gotchas...

my experience with Tomcat has been that setup of Tomcat itself is not
easy, even when deploying a prepackaged WAR file.

What "setup"? Untar the distribution, edit the config file if you want
other than the default ports, drop in your WAR file, start. E.Z.

Not in my experience -- I had terrible trouble getting Tomcat to
actually work. Perhaps things have changed.

But, horses for courses...

Does that actually mean anything in this connection?

--
Hassan Schroeder ------------------------ hassan.schroeder@gmail.com
twitter: @hassan

Best,