How do I tell if anything is happening with a TRAC ticket?

Hi guys,

Is there any way of telling what is happening with a particular TRAC
ticket, or where it sits in the priority list?

For example

#8052

This is a small patch I submitted about 5 months ago, but nothing
seems to have happened with it since. I'm not sure if this is because
it has simply been deemed low priority or if it just hasn't been
noticed by anyone. Is there something else I should have done to draw
attention to it?

#8163

This is a scriptaculous problem that has caused us problems on my
current project, forcing us to fork scriptaculous. I can see that a
number of patches have been submitted, so I am interested in wether it
is intended for this to be fixed in a upcoming release or not. Is
there a way to tell?

cheers
Perryn

#8052

This is a small patch I submitted about 5 months ago, but nothing
seems to have happened with it since. I’m not sure if this is because
it has simply been deemed low priority or if it just hasn’t been

noticed by anyone. Is there something else I should have done to draw
attention to it?

I’ve updated your patch for latest trunk. Diff is now in smaller chunks, which is way better for readability. However, some unit tests still fail. After you fix this, get 3 community members to review the patch (2 except me) and then it will get the “verified” keyword.

#8163

This is a scriptaculous problem that has caused us problems on my

current project, forcing us to fork scriptaculous.

You should discuss script.aculo.us problems on Rails-spinoffs mailing list or the #prototype channel on freenode.

I can see that a
number of patches have been submitted, so I am interested in wether it

is intended for this to be fixed in a upcoming release or not. Is
there a way to tell?

No, not really. If you really solved the problem for yourself in the company, your best bet is to actually make a patch and submit it with the current ticket.

I would also add that tickets that don’t get immediate attention will rarely get committed without some sort of followup action from the author. Often times the committers won’t easily be able to evaluate the quality of a patch or the legitimacy of an issue, while the people who are affected by the issue may never see the patch to begin with.

Posting here with a code review request is always a good idea for important patches that seem to get lost in the shuffle. In addition, calling attention to the issue on IRC or in other mailing lists or on blogs will help get the right people involved.

If someone thinks the patch is a bad idea they’ll generally say so. Complete silence just means no one has had the time to evaluate the patch.

I also support bumping the patches one or two times on either the ML or IRC. It doesn’t even have to be months later, it can only be 2-3 weeks later after the original patch didn’t get attention. No comments on a ticket can also mean that the ticket description is vague and that the patch may not be self-descriptive (too complicated or not very well done).

Hi guys,

So it sounds like I should have posted about my patch here in the
first place :slight_smile:
(Thanks for taking a look at it Mislav, I'll take a look at the tests
as soon as I get a chance.)

In regards to the scriptaculous problem, there have already been a
number of submitted patches for the problem
( in fact we just copied one of them to make ours), so I didn't see
the point in submitting another one. I was
just interested in if there was a way to see when and if those patches
were planned to be applied.
The answer seems to be to simply ask on the mailing list ( in this
case the scriptaculous list)
I'll do that now :slight_smile:

thanks for your help
Perryn