= FALSE vs. IS NOT TRUE

Hello,
   i have a column in my table 'is_inappropriate' which is boolean,
but can be null
  Here is my simplified code, and i want to keep conditions in hash
type.
    @reviews ||=
      Review.find(
        :all,
        :conditions => {:is_inappropriate => false})

sql result is :
select * from reviews where reviews.is_inappropriate = False

but this is what i want :
select * from reviews where reviews.is_inappropriate IS NOT TRUE

someone can helps me?

Just use:

  :conditions => "is_inappropriate IS NOT TRUE"

Chris

:conditions => {:is_inappropriate => 'IS NOT TRUE'}) doesn't work and
i'm aware that :conditions can be a string but i want to have an hash

Well, I'm afraid you can't have a hash. The hash style lets you test
equality, or a range. Those are the only options. If you want to
generate the SQL "IS NOT TRUE", then you have to use another style.

Chris

thanks chris, do you know if it is possible to mix hash and string
value in :conditions ?

Yeah, you can do something like this:

query = "Jean"

self.find(:all, :conditions =>
  ["name = :name AND is_inappropriate IS NOT TRUE",
   {:name => query}])

In other words, if you pass an array consisting of a string and a
hash, the find method will substitute values in the string (like
":name" in this example) using the values that you've passed in the
hash.

Chris

Just in case you weren’t aware… the second you do ‘is_inappropriate IS NOT TRUE’ you lock yourself into a specific database. Some databases treat TRUE as true, some use T., some use 1. Yuk. Of course, that’s not usually a problem but I thought I’d point it out.