About RoR sites license

Hello,

Ruby on Rails is licensed under the MIT.

Is there a restriction over the license of the web site developped with this framework? For example, if I build a web site with RoR framework, can I put my application under an other license such as BSD?

Thank you.

Z4ng'

Zangief Ief wrote:

For example, if I build a web site with RoR framework, can I put my application under an other license such as BSD?

Yes. The RoR license imposes no restrictions on works created with RoR. And very few on RoR itself.

If you plan to redistribute somebody else's software, it's probably worth actually reading the license. MIT license is particularly short and easy to understand. There is just one restriction in it (the second paragraph).

The MIT License

Copyright (c) <year> <copyright holders>

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

Thanks for your precision.

So if I build my own RoR application based on RoR, I need to respect the MIT license. But if I build my own web application thanks to RoR, there is not any restriction.

Greetings 2008.

Have you read the damn license? :slight_smile:

It doesn't demand respect. Only that you include the text of the license with "any substantial portions of Rails", and don't sue authors / copyright holders under any circumstances. In practice, if you vendor Rails in your app (as you always should), vendor/rails directory will contain MIT-LICENSE files, as required.

How you license your own app is not restricted by MIT license at all. It's not GPL.

If you write a Rails app and release it under BSD, _your application code_ is under BSD, _not_ Rails. Rails is still MIT.

--Jeremy

Jeremy McAnally wrote:

If you write a Rails app and release it under BSD, _your application code_ is under BSD, _not_ Rails. Rails is still MIT.

--Jeremy

Thanks :slight_smile:

Like Jeremy said, different portions of your package can have different licenses, with one caveat: as long as nothing inside is licensed under GPL.

By the way, MIT and BSD licenses are, practically speaking, the same contract (do whatever you please, include this license, don't sue us).

Alexey Verkhovsky wrote:

  

But I don't know how it could be possible to give to my projet a license such as the BSD one with RoR which is in MIT.      Like Jeremy said, different portions of your package can have different licenses, with one caveat: as long as nothing inside is licensed under GPL.    To make things clear : I'm pretty sure you can release a Rails application under the GPL. What is forbidden is the other way : use a GPL library in your Rails application and release it as BSD, MIT or proprietary (anything but GPL compatible licenses). Anyway... GPL libraries are pretty rare (they are LGPL usually).

So basically with Rails, you can release your code anyway you want as long as you include the BSD/MIT licenses for the relevant packages and check any library outside Rails/Ruby core/stdlib for caveats.

Lionel

To make things clear : I'm pretty sure you can release a Rails application under the GPL. What is forbidden is the other way

Of course.

check any library outside Rails/Ruby core/stdlib for caveats.

Well, here is the catch: parts of Ruby core *are* GPL. :frowning: Don't include Ruby core/stdlib in your own package, or, if you absolutely must, include JRuby instead - JRuby is 100% non-viral.

Alexey Verkhovsky wrote:

check any library outside Rails/Ruby core/stdlib for caveats.     

Well, here is the catch: parts of Ruby core *are* GPL. :frowning:    I wasn't aware of that. A grep on /usr/lib/ruby only returned LGPL matches on my system which isn't a problem, do you have any pointers to the specific code under GPL?

Lionel

Oops, my bad, was writing from [faulty] memory. LGPL it is, indeed. :slight_smile: