37signals Getting Real purchase system, credit card check

Hi all,

quick question

does anyone know what 37signals is using on
https://gettingreal.37signals.com/purchases/new

I'm assuming it's a basic Rails backend ... but what I really like is the
credit card / cart simplicity -- and instant checking?

No idea how that would be done ...... third-party system on the backend
(ocCommerce? authorize.net?) or just some bank-API

Any thoughts appreciated!

I don't think they are using Rails. If you point your browser at
   https://gettingreal.37signals.com/index.php
you'll get a page. I think that means they run the site on PHP.

Oh my, is this is a worrisome sign about Rails?

I don't think they are using Rails. If you point your browser at
  https://gettingreal.37signals.com/index.php
you'll get a page. I think that means they run the site on PHP.

Oh my, is this is a worrisome sign about Rails?

No... somewhere DHH has said that one should use the best tool for the job... I actually specifically remmeber him mentioning their site... that PHP was enough and Rails would have been overkill or some such...

Probably along the lines of "if it works, why change it?"

Of course, I could be totally wrong too :slight_smile:

They've said several times that they use PHP for individual pages and
things were they just need a few includes or whatever, and a full-
blown Rails app would be overkill. I believe the SVN blog used to run
on Movable Type, generating PHP pages to add some dynamic elements, or
something like that. Chances are they're using PHP for the info and
content pages of the Getting Real site too. Makes perfect sense to me.

But the purchase app at https://gettingreal.37signals.com/purchases/new
is very clearly Rails based -- just have a peek at some of the HTML
that's been generated.

Chris

The source to https://gettingreal.37signals.com/purchases/new looks
like bog standard Rails to me. Naming conventions, multi attribute
date assignments, the lot...

If memory serves me well, before DHH started Rails at 37signals, they
were a PHP shop. He did some PHP cosulting for them, but they moved
to ruby after that. The index.php might be remnants of that time.

No idea about the CC backend by the way...

-christos

Hi Chris, please understand that 37signals is a company and the
information that you're requesting maybe proprietary.

-Conrad

Shopify released their backed framework for CC processing under the
name ActiveMerchant (http://home.leetsoft.com/am).

Ha, yeah, I know that

I just figured if someone knew what systems they were running ..... wasn't
trying to steal any inside info

thanks tho :wink:

"Conrad Taylor" <conradwt@gmail.com> wrote in
message news:7317d7610702081554q4f1032c6nfd16c43ecfd1ae9b@mail.gmail.com...

Hi Chris, please understand that 37signals is a company and the
information that you're requesting maybe proprietary.

-Conrad

>
> Hi all,
>
> quick question
>
> does anyone know what 37signals is using on
> https://gettingreal.37signals.com/purchases/new
>
>
> I'm assuming it's a basic Rails backend ... but what I really like is

the

"Chris Mear" <chris@odegy.com> wrote in
message news:1170976417.978694.20400@k78g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

But the purchase app at https://gettingreal.37signals.com/purchases/new
is very clearly Rails based -- just have a peek at some of the HTML
that's been generated.

Chris

Yeah, my thought exactly .... just intrigued by the purchase app ..........
Suggestion is Active Merchant so far ... that sound right to anyone? if so,
then I will definately keep Active Merchant on the shortlist for my own
purchasing/validation system

Thanks all

Don’t know what they’re using, but check out Substruct…

We’re using the Payment gem, not the ActiveMerchant gem for now.

http://dev.subimage.com/projects/substruct

We use Rails with ActiveMerchant against a Trust Commerce gateway. It was easy to setup and works well. Since there is only basic documentation, just look at the source code, samples, and tests to understand how to use ActiveMerchant. The nice thing about going this route is that you have some flexibility in being able to switch to other processors fairly easily should you need to.

We were able to start with the ActiveMerchant tests to create a full set of tests with different cards and data to fully understand what error codes and messages we would get back. That made the live testing almost uneventful :slight_smile: