Using Thread.new in :after_save on 1.9, why not?

Hello, can You please explain to me why we can't use Thread.new in
:after_save?

Let's suppose the following situation: we have a blog and using remote
search engine (in form of http service) to index it. So, after any
change to the blog post we should also make an http call to notify
search service about changes. In the code it will look something like
this:

  class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
    after_save do |model|
      Thread.new do
        # making remote HTTP call.
        remote_search_engine.update model
      end
    end
  end

  class PostController < ActiveController::Base
    def upate
      post = Post.by_id(params[:id])
      post.update_attributes params[:post]
      render json: post
    end
  end

Theoretically it should work. It should update post, immediately return
JSON response,
and finish call to the search engine sometime later
But nobody does this, why?

For a very long time, I thought that nobody using this technique because
this external http call will blocks the whole VM, so it make no sense to
use it.
But a couple days ago I found that this is actually wrong, this http
call will not block the VM (Fibur as a prove
https://gist.github.com/1498215 ).

So, now I wondering - what other problems are out there? Why nobody uses
this and use instead tools like delayed_job and resque?

Thanks!

Hello, can You please explain to me why we can’t use Thread.new in

:after_save?

Let’s suppose the following situation: we have a blog and using remote

search engine (in form of http service) to index it. So, after any

change to the blog post we should also make an http call to notify

search service about changes. In the code it will look something like

this:

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base

after_save do |model|

  Thread.new do

    # making remote HTTP call.

    remote_search_engine.update model

  end

end

end

class PostController < ActiveController::Base

def upate

  post = Post.by_id(params[:id])

  post.update_attributes params[:post]

  render json: post

end

end

Theoretically it should work. It should update post, immediately return

JSON response,

and finish call to the search engine sometime later

But nobody does this, why?

For a very long time, I thought that nobody using this technique because

this external http call will blocks the whole VM, so it make no sense to

use it.

But a couple days ago I found that this is actually wrong, this http

call will not block the VM (Fibur as a prove

https://gist.github.com/1498215 ).

So, now I wondering - what other problems are out there? Why nobody uses

this and use instead tools like delayed_job and resque?

My guess would be because of the overhead in managing threads. If your rails code is spawning a new thread after every save, that could get dangerous really quickly. So then you would need some kind of thread manager to make sure that threads are properly closing, that threads aren’t interfering with each other (what if you save a model twice in quick succession and, for one reason or another, the first thread takes longer to complete so effectively the results of this thread win out in the end), etc?

Yes, this make sense, but this is only one case from a lots of other
possibilities. For example, we can reduce the request time by fetching
user and post in parallel, like this:

  user, post = [
    Thread.new{User.by_id request.cookies[:user_id]},
    Thread.new{Post.by_id params[:id]}
  ].collect(&:value)

Although in this case, there's probably maybe some issues with MySQL
driver (more exactly with its C extension).
But in the case of HTTP requests (for CouchDB for example) this should
work.
But for some reasons nobody uses such technics.