Rails 2.3.8 or Rails 3 ?

Hi,
If I'm going to start developing a new rails based web application,
should I go for Rails 3 or Rails 2.3.8 ? why this and not the other ?
Thank you.
Dani

Dani Dani wrote:

Hi,
If I'm going to start developing a new rails based web application,
should I go for Rails 3 or Rails 2.3.8 ? why this and not the other ?
Thank you.
Dani

From what I've seen even though Rails 2.3.8 is supposedly the current
"stable" version of Rails, I'm betting that Rails 3.0 is actually more
"stable." I'm planning to skip from 2.3.5 straight to Rails 3.0 (with
possibly a brief stop at 2.3.8 just to maybe ease the transition to
Rails 3.0). However, I so plan to go straight from 2.3.5 to 3.0 on my
deployment server.

If it were me starting something new, I would mostly likely go with
Rails 3.0. There are a lot of really great new features and chance are
likely that Rails 3.0 will be officially release before you're ready to
deploy.

However, there are other things to consider. Like where you plan to host
the site and whether they are ready for Rails 3.0.

If you are not already experienced with Rails I would also consider
the fact there is a lot more help, tutorials, and so on available for
2.3

Colin

if you know RUBY very well, not rails, than there is no problem, go
for rails 3.
but if the reverse is true, if you know RAILS well not ruby, which
most of people do, then stick with 2.3.8

if you know RUBY very well, not rails, than there is no problem, go
for rails 3.
but if the reverse is true, if you know RAILS well not ruby, which
most of people do, then stick with 2.3.8

Can you explain the logic of that please?

Colin

the logic behind it is, if you encounter a problem while using rails
3, your past rails knowledge will not save you and you will spent more
time while searching answers than developing your application, but if
your ruby background is good, than you can easily solve the problems
you'll encounter.

Rails 3.0

You don't want to bother about upgrading later.

Thank you all.

When is Rails 3 will be announced officially ?
Dani

the logic behind it is, if you encounter a problem while using rails
3, your past rails knowledge will not save you and you will spent more
time while searching answers than developing your application,

I am not sure about that. The advantage that an experienced Rails
developer has is that when he has a problem he knows that it is a
Rails 3 issue rather than a lack of understanding of Rails itself.

Colin

http://weblog.rubyonrails.org/2010/8/24/rails-3-0-release-candidate-2

Best regards

Peter De Berdt

In my personal opinion it is good to start NEW projects in Rails3 —
RC1 was pretty stable and I had no problems with developing my apps in
the new framework :slight_smile: But there is a little problem with some plugins,
some of them need to use exact version, branch or so :slight_smile:

So my answer is: "Start developing new apps with new Rails3" :slight_smile:

… keeping in mind that just about every resource on the web except for Rails 3 specific ones and the Rails 3 API will have outdated information. A lot has changed in Rails 3 (for the better), but the significant changes to initialization (bundler), plugin hooks, ActiveRecord (arel), ActionPack etc might make it harder since you will have very little to no help available on the web. It all depends on how much time you have to get the hang of the new version. Us seasoned Rails developers have it a bit easier, since we only need to get rid of old habits.

Do check out the Railscasts.com screencasts on Rails 3, they can come in quite useful. Also, given the vibrant Rails community, it probably won’t take long for Rails 3 posts to pop up everywhere.

That said, it’s a good idea to start developing in Rails 3 right away, but keep what I’ve said in mind :slight_smile:

Best regards

Peter De Berdt