Need some information about the site twitter.com developed using RoR..

Hi,

This is Santosh Gupta working in Accenture, India as project lead and J2EE architect.

I need some information about twitter.com. This information I need to tell my management & team about the usage of Rails in twitter.com and influence their decision of using Rails in our next project.

Can someone please let me know that: • Approx how many lines of code (of phython/Django) was written initially to bring up the site? • Approx how many users access the site (per day or month)? • What is the execution Architecture? [ OS, DB, Appserver etc] • How many developers worked to build the site initially and how many developers work now? • How many months/weeks it took initially to build the site?

Or if you can direct me to some blog or mailing list where this information is available, it would be of great help. Hoping for a positive and quick response.

Thanks & Regards, Santosh Gupta

Twitter is a Scala app.

@brian   The backend of twitter was moved to scala from rails because they did not know how to scale rails back then, the frontend is still ruby on rails.

Sender: rubyonrails-talk@googlegroups.com

Santosh Gupta wrote in post #961388:

Hi,

This is Santosh Gupta working in Accenture, India as project lead and J2EE architect.

I need some information about twitter.com.

Then why not ask the folks at Twitter?

This information I need to tell my management & team about the usage of Rails in twitter.com and influence their decision of using Rails in our next project.

Twitter is very poorly designed. If you want a *good* Rails example, try Ravelry, Hulu, or LinkedIn.

Can someone please let me know that:   Approx how many lines of code (of phython/Django) was written initially to bring up the site?

Python? Django? Probably 0 lines.

Best,

@brian The backend of twitter was moved to scala from rails because they did not know how to scale rails back then, the frontend is still ruby on rails.

You are correct; I was too terse. The twitter front-end is served up by Rails, from what I understand, it is now largely a consumer of the scala back-end and handles very little to none of Twitter's business logic. Given the advanced state of the API it might be fun to attempt a clone of the twitter front-end using simply static HTML and javascript.

Who really cares where the data comes from and goes to though? If someone wraps their data layer and business logic up in scala/ whatever, how does that change anything? I would say that a "front end served up by Rails" is still a "Rails app".

Abstraction of the data layer to me doesn't seem like a bad architecture, or even "unrailsy". It's just another, equally valid way of solving the problem. Or does every single line of code have to be written in ruby?

Will

You are correct; I was too terse. The twitter front-end is served up by Rails, from what I understand, it is now largely a consumer of the scala back-end and handles very little to none of Twitter's business logic.

Who really cares where the data comes from and goes to though?

I believe one Mr. Santosh Gupta did.