disadvantages of Ruby on Rails

One disadvantage is that you can hardly ever convince your boss to use
it in the workplace.

As far as I know it doesn’t scale out to a webfarm unless I’m wrong and there is a way of maintaining the session in a database.

One of its disadvantages is the lack of complete documentation
online. (Books help) Some of the generated rubydocs will just
contain the name of the method and nothing else (compared to php.net/
your-function-name-here with lots of user comments and tutorials) or
the javadocs from sun. For instance try to find some documentation
on how the post, get or head shortcuts work and what parameters they
accept in rails.

Andy

As far as I know it doesn't scale out to a webfarm unless I'm wrong

it does, but it costs. ruby is, relative to other languages, slow. rails has a lot of techniques to compensate for that slowness in most scenarios. however, those techniques involve more resources.

between jruby and yarv the speed issue is likely to go away in the next couple years. also, consider your deployment scenario to know if this limitation is actually a legitimate concern.

and there is a way of maintaining the session in a database.

use the activerecord store

-faisal

As far as I know it doesn't scale out to a webfarm unless I'm wrong
and there is a way of maintaining the session in a database.

You can scale to a webfarm, and put sessions in the DB or memcache or
turn them off or all kinds of things.

Rails scales very nicely to multiple server environments.

Jonathan Parker wrote:
> As far as I know it doesn't scale out to a webfarm unless I'm wrong
> and there is a way of maintaining the session in a database.
>

In environment.rb:

# Use the database for sessions instead of the file system
# (create the session table with 'rake db:sessions:create')
config.action_controller.session_store = :active_record_store

config.action_controller.session = { :session_key => "_my_session_id",
             :secret => "some secret phrase" }

Voila... sessions in the db.

b

Because rails is the hot commodity right now, it can be difficult to
find developers. People are learning as quickly as they can, but a
good rails programmer, if you can find one, will cost.

cheers!
Adam

This is true of any language. Good programmers cost money.

Is it a disadvantage that there aren't a bunch of bad Rails programmers yet? That's debatable, but I don't think so.

I think the assertion that there aren't a bunch of bad Rails programmers
yet is debatable. :wink:

  - Tyler

I'm a bad Rails programmer! (thought I'm trying to change that)

One of the reasons we chose to go with RoR for our current projects is
that we figured there would be a greater concentration of good
programmers that know RoR as supposed to Java. That has turned out to
be the case so far.

There are a couple good free sights for posting Ruby job
requistions.

rubydc.com (DC only obviously)
http://jobs.rubynow.com/
and you can't beat a $25 craigslist posting