Valentina Database Now Supports Ruby on Rails on Mac OS X

http://www.valentina-db.com/

Valentina 3.5.1 technology release now includes support for building
RoR applications on Mac OS X. They have previously released support on
the Windows platform. There is also a component for building local
Ruby apps as well.

You can read more on their site or their publisher mirye.com.

And this is cheaper than MySQL and PostgreSQL and SQLite by how much?

Having no affiliation with this company whatsoever and have to say this is a bit unfair towards this excellent db. It’s true it’s not free, but some people like paying for the benefits of a database. I’m looking at Daylite (crm/erp application for macos x) for example which is using the commercial Openbase because of it’s excellent stability, transparent offline synchronisation capabilities etc.

I’ve used Valentina with a few of the other languages that it supports and in terms of speed, it blows away the other dbs away easily. What I particularly liked about it when using it in conjunction with REALbasic (which can be great for low budget applications), was its object-relational nature, binary links (habtm without a real table) and its random virtual recordset access. Instead of having to use LIMIT and OFFSET, you could query a recordset that let’s say yields a 50,000 record result, then randomly say: well, get me object 10,212 to 10,500 and 35,141 and 44,984 to 45,014 and send it over to me. There’s a whole lot of query parsing and seperate queries involved if you’d be using plain sql for this. I don’t know how far this support is backed into their adapter, but if it is, you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

To give you a simple example, in a company I used to work for, a prospect asked us to make his very large database with quite a few linked tables live searchable locally on those old clamshell ibooks and some superslow dell laptops. I spent about one day, maybe even a little less and I had both the Windows and Mac version of the app compiled and ready to run, including an import procedure to import all the data. Every keydown in the app narrowed the list down almost instantly using a random access datagrid, and I’m talking about some fulltext searched fields here too or you could browse through all of the records using the scrollbar. We never deemed such a thing possible on those old machines, still Valentina did it without a fuss.

Also, if you look at the licensing scheme, it’s a lot more clear than MySQL’s, which is not as free as you claim it to be.

Best regards

Peter De Berdt

Also, if you look at the licensing scheme, it's a lot more clear than

http://www.mysql.com/company/legal/licensing/

Seems pretty clear to me.

MySQL's, which is not as free as you claim it to be.

What does "not as free" even mean? You're very confused. If the
degree of "free" MySQL offers isn't enough then there's also
PostgreSQL and SQLite as I mentioned before.

And who really cares if MySQL is free or not, they're not spamming
off-topic ads into the list.

http://www.mysql.com/company/legal/licensing/

Seems pretty clear to me.

What does “not as free” even mean?

It means if you make money of something that uses mysql, you have to pay for it (and you have to pay a lot). Although some might say if the customer installs mysql themselves, the commercial license doesn’t apply, nor if your application can use different databases, nor if the mysql database adapter is open source. Everybody has a different story about what is the truth now. Unless you’re using the 4.0 version of mysql that is, which was basically free IIRC. That’s what I call a confusing and “not as free as you claim” license.

You’re very confused. If the

degree of “free” MySQL offers isn’t enough then there’s also

PostgreSQL and SQLite as I mentioned before.

That’s why those two weren’t mentioned. Valentina still has several features that make it stand out over all the databases you mentioned (and may have shortcomings compared to them).

And who really cares if MySQL is free or not, they’re not spamming

off-topic ads into the list.

One message about a new rails database adapter for a commercial database is something you consider spamming? Why didn’t you go all berserk on the Openbase adapter announcement then. Guess Lynn should have made the message longer and with lots of asterisks and [ANN] headers, maybe that would have been less spam to you.

If the Lynn starts flooding this list on a daily basis with that announcement just like the 2GB free download space (or what is it) bullocks or non-ruby or RoR related (check the website, it’s about Rails, and it’s posted on a Rails mailing list), then I’ll be happy to support your case. But I understand your frustration with spam these days, this pre-holiday period has been a real pain for my mailbox too =)

Best regards

Peter De Berdt

> Valentina 3.5.1 technology release now includes support for building
> RoR applications on Mac OS X. They have previously released support on
> the Windows platform. There is also a component for building local
> Ruby apps as well.

> You can read more on their site or their publisher mirye.com.

And this is cheaper than MySQL and PostgreSQL and SQLite by how much?

That is entirely dependent on total cost of your project and if those
products do everything everyone needs - it has almost nothing to do
with it being free to download. Unless developer time is totally free,
and the impact of delivery is non-existent, then no worries.