Phusion Passenger for Intranet?

Hi,

we have a mac osx server in the intranet where i want to host my rails
application. I installed successfully passenger on the machine.

Now when I am working on the server, I can access the rails app
through the url, e.g. test.local

But when I put the same URL in the browser in one of the other
computers, I can't reach it. I can access it though the IP though,
192.168.2.200:3000

What else do I need to do in order to make it visible in the intranet?
Some router seetup?

on the macserver is already running the default osx wiki etc. this can
be adressed from other computer as http://myserver/ - it would be nice
if i can setup passenger to use a subfolder of this adress, e.g.
http://myserver/myapp/

Thanks in advanve

we have a mac osx server in the intranet where i want to host my rails
application. I installed successfully passenger on the machine.

Now when I am working on the server, I can access the rails app
through the url, e.g. test.local

But when I put the same URL in the browser in one of the other
computers, I can’t reach it. I can access it though the IP though,
192.168.2.200:3000

What else do I need to do in order to make it visible in the intranet?
Some router seetup?

My guess is that although the MacOS X Server has the DNS running and (more or less configured), you are not using that DNS on your clients. You have two options here: either configure your DHCP server (router probably) to use your OS X server as a DNS or set it manually on all your clients in the Network control panel.

BTW, why would you run Apache or nginx on port 3000 when you can just run everything on the same webserver?

on the macserver is already running the default osx wiki etc. this can
be adressed from other computer as http://myserver/ - it would be nice
if i can setup passenger to use a subfolder of this adress, e.g.
http://myserver/myapp/

It’s called Apache (or Nginx) configuration and has very little to nothing to do with Rails. There’s plenty of resources on the web.

http://www.google.com/search?q=mac+os+x+apache+vhost

Best regards

Peter De Berdt

Hi Peter,

thanks for your reply.

BTW, why would you run Apache or nginx on port 3000 when you can just
run everything on the same webserver?

I don't have apache running on 3000 - it have Webbrick still running
there so the clients can reach the rails app, but I want to deploy it
via passenger to them as it seems more stable and better for
production. Just we can't reach it running on Passenger from the
clients in the intranet.

I just wondered if anyone ever configured a scenario like this and can
share his experience, I know it has little to do with rails actually,
hope you guys don't mind.

Frank

Deploying for your intranet is basically the same as deploying on a “public” server. Passenger is a module for Apache or Nginx just like the PHP processor is. You follow the instructions on the Passenger site to get it installed, nothing more, nothing less.

Then there’s the other three things I talked about that have more to do with the actual webserving side of things:

  • Apache/Nginx Vhost configuration: allows you to map internal “domains” like myapp.rails or myrailsapp.local or whatever flavor you prefer to a certain directory with a certain interpreter. This allows you to host your wiki on wiki.mycompany.local and your railsapp on railsapp.mycompany.local.

  • DNS configuration: in order for your internal desktop/laptop computers to know about these domains, they need to be set up in the DNS you are choosing (MacOS X server has BIND built-in and it has a nice configuration utility called Server Admin to manage it). I myself find the setup in OS X quite easy to get a hang of and if you can’t get a hang of it google should be your friend to figure out how to do it. It’s specific to your internal structure and there is no clearcut answer as to how to do it. A DNS is basically a “post office” that knows how to translate human readable URLs to network addresses. “Can you tell me the address of myrailsapp.mycompany.local?” “Why yes sir, you’ll find him at 192.1.1.55”. You can also configure the MacOS X server DNS in its turn to pass on URLs it doesn’t know about to for example your ISPs DNS.

  • Network settings through DHCP: most people use some kind of router, whether that’s a physical box or a service you run on a server to configure clients on the network: assign IP addresses from either a static pool or a dynamic pool, tell them which DNS to use (your ISP will also have a DNS, but that one won’t know about your internal addresses of course). Again, this is going to depend on what you are using internally and you’ll have to search for documentation specific to your setup in order to know how to configure it. Suppose you have your OS X Server at 192.1.1.44, then you’ll need to set your DHCP server to tell the clients to set their DNS to 192.1.1.44.

If all of the above is sounding way too complicated or completely out of your comfort zone and you don’t want to invest time (and thus probably billable hours aka money) in figuring out the nuts and bolts, you should just hire someone that’s comfortable with it. You’ll have to decide whether spending a couple of hundred bucks on a server admin will be more cost effective than you spending a day or two figuring out how your network needs to be set up (and you being able to adjust things afterwards because you know how everything works of course). I’ll add as a last note that if you have the theoretical background on how network setup and webserving work, it shouldn’t take you all too long to get things done.

I know this probably isn’t the “download application X and run it and everything magically will start working” or “here’s a blog post I made with step by step instructions on how to set up a web serving infrastructure”, but that’s just because there is no “one way to rule them all” information board out there. It seems you pretty much have a setup in your company already, you’ll need to (have someone) find out how to glue everything together.

Best regards

Peter De Berdt

Hi,

thank you very much for taking the time to give this detailed answer.
I will go through it through the weekend in detail as I want to be
able to administrate these things myself.
I'll let you know how it goes..

frank

I just want to note that passenger does not run on webrick , passenger is an apache/nginx module.