Is textilize bad?

I'm reading "Beginning Ruby on Rails E-Commerce".

Caution: Although textilize is a cool quick-and-dirty helper, as a rule
of thumb, it should never be used in a production setting.

What's wrong with textilize?
What's a better alternative?

I haven't used it myself, but textile is redcloth... and I seem to remember a thread awhile back (not even sure it was this group) about redcloth vs bluecloth and speed issues... So maybe textile is kind of slow?

But again, I haven't used it, so could be completely wrong. Search google for textile/redcloth/bluecloth for more...

Philip Hallstrom wrote:

I'm reading "Beginning Ruby on Rails E-Commerce".

Caution: Although textilize is a cool quick-and-dirty helper, as a rule
of thumb, it should never be used in a production setting.

What's wrong with textilize?
What's a better alternative?
    
I haven't used it myself, but textile is redcloth... and I seem to
remember a thread awhile back (not even sure it was this group) about
redcloth vs bluecloth and speed issues... So maybe textile is kind of
slow?

But again, I haven't used it, so could be completely wrong. Search google
for textile/redcloth/bluecloth for more...

>
  

I believe in this context the authors were saying that it was bad to use
on text on each render. You are going to want to cache your pages
and/or textilize the text as it goes into the db so you do not get a
large speed hit on each page render.

Matthew Margolis
blog.mattmargolis.net

Matthew Margolis wrote:

I believe in this context the authors were saying that it was bad to use
on text on each render. You are going to want to cache your pages
and/or textilize the text as it goes into the db so you do not get a
large speed hit on each page render.

Bingo! The quote in the original post was part of a section called
"Rendering Speed".

//jarkko