is an application for state machine?

I've to make an application to monitor the installation and replacement of all the PCs in my company. The PCs to be replaced are a few hundred. In practice, the work should take place as follows: a number of officers receiving some cards. Following interviews with users of PCs, the cards are compiled, eg by including a list of software that the user needs and that must be allocated in the new pc replacing the old, or by entering the name of the machine must be configured in the new, the date and time the user says to be eligible for when you must replace the PC, etc.. etc.. Once you fill out these cards are viewed by a person and delivered to the company responsible for the replacement and installation of new pcs. During this work, replacement of new PCs can arise wrong, for example, the user will not be found, or some problem occurs during installation and other contingencies of any kind. If the work is done, the company regularly inform the responsible the ok, otherwise the work is suspended or canceled or postponed at another time. Do you think that one type of application of this kind is suitable for the use of a finite state machine?

Msan Msan wrote in post #949644:

I've to make an application to monitor the installation and replacement of all the PCs in my company.

[...]

Do you think that one type of application of this kind is suitable for the use of a finite state machine?

Quite likely, but why do you even care at this stage? Determine how the application should behave for its users before you worry about implementation.

Best,

Sorry but my english understanding is very bad. Can you explain better?

Msan Msan wrote in post #949798:

Msan Msan wrote in post #949644:

I've to make an application to monitor the installation and replacement of all the PCs in my company.

[...]

Do you think that one type of application of this kind is suitable for the use of a finite state machine?

Quite likely, but why do you even care at this stage? Determine how the application should behave for its users before you worry about implementation.

Sorry but my english understanding is very bad.

Then please improve your English, and/or find a Rails forum in a language you understand better (several non-Engljsh Rails forums exist).

Can you explain better?

What part didn't you understand?

What I was trying to say was this: you're apparently in the early stages of designing your application. Therefore, you need to think about user interface now -- how the application should behave from the user's point of view. You do not yet need to think about how the application works internally.

Is that clearer?

Best,

I have just clear what the user interface must be and what users must do when they log in.

Sorry but my english understanding is very bad.

Your English is fine for me, at least the written one.

I've to make an application to monitor the installation and replacement of all the PCs in my company.

[...]

Do you think that one type of application of this kind is suitable for the use of a finite state machine?

IMHO I think you know enough about your problem to start thinking about the implementation. I think a state machine would probably work for you based on what you have described. You can find a few options at http://ruby-toolbox.com. If none of them help you I would consider then implementing it yourself, which should not be hard. If you decide going that route I'll be happy to share with you how I implemented something similar to a state machine for a similar problem not long ago using modules.

Msan Msan wrote in post #949863:

Quite likely, but why do you even care at this stage? Determine how the

What part didn't you understand?

What I was trying to say was this: you're apparently in the early stages of designing your application. Therefore, you need to think about user interface now -- how the application should behave from the user's point of view. You do not yet need to think about how the application works internally.

I have just clear what the user interface must be and what users must do when they log in.

OK, then you're probably ready to write some Cucumber scenarios and try to implement them.

State machines are great for anything where a procedure with certain steps and defined transitions between those steps is followed. Common examples (with transitions in parentheses):

User: registered (send authorization code) waiting for auth (receive authorization code) authorized

Issue: reported (assign) assigned (complete work) work done; waiting for review (review passed) closed ...or (review failed) assigned for more work...continue cycle

Depending on your workflows, you may find this very useful for the app you describe. You might not, depending on the details of the case, but it's worth a try when the time comes.

Best,