Development Question

I have the following:

Windows Vista (primary machine)
-- 1.9.1-p129 and all gems I currently need
-- using netbeans IDE 6.5
-- have a primary project being developed

Ubuntu 9.x (VMWare box on primary machine)
-- 1.9.1-p129 and all gems I currently need
-- using netbeans IDE 6.5
-- has a copied version of the primary project being developed

Ubuntu Hardy (VPS - main website hosted through slicehost)
-- 1.9.1-p129 and all gems I currently need
-- no projects uploaded or tested yet

Älphä Blüë wrote:

1. I tested out the VMware box and was able to load my project and even
work on it. I received no errors and all tasks seemed to perform well.
This leads me to believe that as long as all three environments have the
exact same version of ruby and exact same version of gems (regardless of
ruby was compiled on windows with ming etc.) that they all should work.
Is this a correct assumption?

I would think so.

2. I would simply code on my VMWare box but it's a little more sluggish
becuse it's a virtual box. I'm also worried that it will crash one day
and unless I'm doing nightly snapshots or saves, I'll lose work.

Why are you worried about that? Linux is a lot less crash-happy than
Windows.

Do you
recommend that I just use this as a test box for my code and keep
developing on windows where I'm used to developing?

Every time you use Windows, a demon gets his horns. :smiley:

3. Any suggestions on backing up data or crossing over data. Is there
a core concept or things to keep in mind when backing up projects after
you've worked on them?

At the moment, my project backup is my version control repository (you
*do* have one of those, right?).

[...]

4. Any other tips that I can use to keep my environment stable and
efficient?

Stop using Windows, which is neither?

Many thanks in advance...

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote:

Why are you worried about that? Linux is a lot less crash-happy than
Windows.

My linux VMWare box is on Windows Vista so if (windows crashes) the
linux box will too..

Although the likelihood of that happening is very slim (I have only had
one crash in over a year and that was due to a hardware issue with bad
memory).

I just like to be safe

At the moment, my project backup is my version control repository (you
*do* have one of those, right?).

Actually I'm just starting my project and haven't done this yet. I'm
looking into doing that now. This was a very good suggestion and I
appreciate it. :slight_smile:

Thanks for the feedback mate.

Älphä Blüë wrote:

Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote:

Why are you worried about that? Linux is a lot less crash-happy than
Windows.

My linux VMWare box is on Windows Vista so if (windows crashes) the
linux box will too..

True, but I would think that the VM would still be in a consistent
state, since *it* was not crashing.
[...]

Actually I'm just starting my project and haven't done this yet. I'm
looking into doing that now. This was a very good suggestion and I
appreciate it. :slight_smile:

That should be about the first thing you do when you start a project.
Version control (I recommend Git) is so amazingly beneficial, and so
easy to set up, that there is absolutely no excuse not to use it. (And
it's nearly essential if you're using Capistrano.)

Thanks for the feedback mate.

You're welcome!

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote:

That should be about the first thing you do when you start a project.
Version control (I recommend Git) is so amazingly beneficial, and so
easy to set up, that there is absolutely no excuse not to use it. (And
it's nearly essential if you're using Capistrano.)

Marnen thanks so much mate!

I had tortoiseSVN installed on my machine (just never used it). I
created a repos and my netbeans IDE actually has subversion built into
it so I can commit changes from there. I tested it all out and it's
working nice. This helps me a ton.

I'm very appreciative.

I have Git Bash installed but I am not very proficient with it. Is
tortoise not good?

Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote:

I use several plugins and gems (RSpec, Hobofields) that extend
script/generate with their own generators. Amazingly, NB does not pick
up the new generators as options, so I'm back at the command line if I
want to use them. This was about when I decided there was no reason to
continue with NB for Rails until something gets upgraded.

I use Rspec-rails and Rspec with NB and it generates fine for me. You
have to add both to vendor/plugins. Once you do that, you right-click
your project -> generate -> and select rspec controller (which shows up
automatically as a new generator in NB), etc. and generate them right
there. I haven't had any issues with rspec doing it this way..

And as a Rails beginner, you should be aware that NB may be hurting you
by not giving easy access to tools you may not yet know you need. (This
may not actually turn out to be an issue, but the possibility is real.)

I always try out multiple ways of doing things, without fully relying on
the IDE to do this for me. Many of the books I'm reading show me how to
do it "manually" so I learn things that way. Once I'm comfortable, I
figure out how to do it the NB way. If it doesn't work in NB, I make a
mental note. I haven't had many issues with things not working well
with NB.

However, HAML and SASS are one exception. NB doesn't make great use of
them and plugins are either out of date or not being actively worked on
anymore for those.

Take care mate. You give great input and feedback and many of us
appreciate it.

I have not tested out Komodoedit - I'll look into it. I'm still early
in my rails programming phases so it's never too late to learn if it
works well.